Category Archives: Addiction Treatment Program

opioid overdoses in arizona

Opioid Overdoses in Arizona

100 Deaths from Opioid Overdoses Each Month in Arizona

Opioid overdoses in Arizona are at their highest rate in a decade. As the opioid crisis escalates across the country, Arizona has been hit especially hard. It currently sits at second in the nation for drug-related death, coming in just behind Nevada. Worse, the numbers have been steadily rising over the last few years.

In 2016, there were 790 overdose-related deaths, representing a 16 percent increase from the previous year. Of these deaths, 482 were caused by prescription drugs; the other 308 were attributed to heroin. This year, the numbers have been even higher, with some estimates placing overdose-related deaths at around 100 per month.

These numbers reflect only a small part of the growing opioid problem in the state. Overdose deaths may be under-reported. These numbers also do not account for all of the non-lethal overdoses that are treated each month nor for the other physical, psychological and economical impacts of the drug crisis.

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opioid overdoses in arizona

The Opioid Epidemic is a Complex Issue

Many of those who develop opioid addiction are individuals who originally obtained their drugs legally through a doctor’s prescription. They may have obtained these drugs for a specific surgery or injury, or they may suffer from a chronic pain condition.

However, thanks to the highly addictive nature of opioids and their difficult withdrawal symptoms, going off of prescription drugs can prove challenging for many people. Additional factors, such as life stress and interpersonal relationship trouble, can contribute to the likelihood of developing an addiction. Once legal access to painkillers is ceased, some addicts may turn to buying their drugs off the street or switching to the comparatively cheaper illcit drug, heroin.

Since the 1990s, America has led the world in opioid prescriptions, and doctors have been known to write extensive prescriptions beyond what is actually necessary to deal with pain. For example, a patient might go to a dentist for a wisdom tooth removal and leave with a weeks-long supply of Vicodin, even though a milder painkiller would likely be just as effective after the first day or two. Having so many extra drugs left over creates opportunities for drug misuse and abuse.

Additionally, despite the real dangers posed by these drugs, prescription painkillers are often viewed by users as being safer than other kinds of drugs. There is less social stigma against taking prescription opioids, and people may not seek help for their dependency until the problem gets out of hand.

Opioids are also notoriously easy to overdose on. Drugs available on the street may not be as pure as what a user is accustomed to. They may be laced with stronger opioids, such as Fentanyl, or they may be in a higher concentration than the user is expecting. A person who has become habituated to a specific dose may also be extremely sensitive to that same dosage after a period without any drugs; when tolerance wanes, a previously safe dose can cause a deadly overdose.

A Holistic Look at Opioid Addiction

Because so many people get hooked on prescription drugs, one suggested solution to controlling the epidemic is to limit the amount of opioid drugs in circulation. That has been the suggestion of Dr. Cara Christ, Arizona’s head health official. Dr. Christ suggests heavy restrictions placed on opioid prescriptions, preventing doctors from prescribing more than are absolutely necessary.

Other solutions, such as the growing availability of the overdose-reversing drug NARCAN®, can help to reduce the amount of opioid-related deaths. However, these measures do not strike at the root of the problem. Being revived does not put an addict into recovery; without further treatment, the user may end up overdosing again in the future.

The reality is that drug addiction is complex, and no single solution will help to solve Arizona’s opioid crisis. While issues are being discussed and implemented on a policy level, it’s important for individuals to obtain the care and intervention that they need.

At Desert Cove Recovery we recognize that addiction is deeply personal and affects each person differently. We offer treatment programs that help people to get sober and stay that way by addressing the underlying causes and contributing factors to their addiction. For more information about our program, contact us today.

most addictive substances

The Most Addictive Substances

What Are the 5 Most Addictive Substances?

While use of any psychoactive substance with pleasurable effects may lead to psychological addiction, certain drugs come with a heightened potential for both physical and psychological addiction. Physical dependence compounds the psychological aspects of addiction as both body and mind crave the drug, resulting in difficult withdrawals. Drugs with these properties have earned notoriety as the most addictive substances in the world.

Using an addictive substance does not guarantee that a pattern of drug abuse will follow. Whether a person becomes addicted to a substance depends on complex factors such as genetics. Repeated use of a highly addictive drug will put the user at a higher risk of developing a habit that requires treatment, particularly if the user is turning to the substance as a coping mechanism.

A scale developed by drug researcher David Nutt and his colleagues is commonly referenced in lists that rank the most addictive substances. The published report assesses how dangerous each drug is based on its potential for dependence, physical harm and social harm on a scale of zero to three. The dependence score takes into account pleasure, physical dependence and psychological dependence.

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most addictive substances

So, what are the most addictive drugs? Here are five that are high on the list:

Opioids

Heroin, an opioid, earned the highest mean score on Nutt’s dependence ranking with a 3.00. It also ranked as the most dangerous drug overall once physical and social harm were taken into account. All drugs in the opioid class, which contains heroin and legal painkillers alike, act similarly on the brain, binding to opioid receptors and increasing dopamine levels. Opioids are depressants that provide pain relief and a feeling of relaxation and euphoria. Because opioids are highly addictive, it’s not uncommon for those who are prescribed painkillers to become dependent and start seeking out heroin on the street. Between 26.4 million and 36 million people are estimated to abuse opioids worldwide.

Cocaine

Cocaine has a significantly lower potential for physical dependence than opioids, but it comes second to heroin on Nutt’s dependence scale with a 2.39 because its ratings for psychological dependence and pleasure are high. Both crack and powder cocaine are included in the rating. This stimulant drug influences the behavior of the neurotransmitters dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, resulting in euphoria and a perceived increase in confidence and energy. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), young adults have the highest rate of cocaine use. In the survey, 1.4 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 reported cocaine use within the past month.

Methamphetamine

Similar to cocaine, methamphetamine is a stimulant that floods the brain with the pleasure-inducing neurotransmitter dopamine. Known as crystal meth on the street, this drug may be snorted, smoked or injected. Meth use results in increased heart rate, appetite suppression, insomnia and paranoia. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reveal that methamphetamine abuse is on the rise with a 30 percent increase in overdose deaths from 2014 to 2015.

Alcohol

Unlike many other drugs, alcohol is universally legal for recreational purposes and is widely accepted by the mainstream. It is frequently cited as the most commonly used addictive substance. Because alcohol is both highly ubiquitous and addictive, a vulnerable person can easily become exposed to it and then addicted. In the US, one in 12 adults is addicted to or dependent on alcohol, which gets an overall addictiveness score of 1.93 according to Nutt’s rating system. Alcohol is classified as a depressant, but its initial effects are more like those caused by a stimulant. Users typically become more talkative and outgoing prior to experiencing alcohol’s sedating effects.

Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines are a class of prescription drugs that act on the neurotransmitter GABA and depress the central nervous system. Due to their sedating properties, they are frequently prescribed for anxiety and insomnia, but unfortunately, some patients end up abusing them. Benzodiazepines are also commonly sold on the street for recreational use and known as benzos. They have a mean dependence score of 1.83 on Nutt’s scale. They are notable for their significant potential for physical dependence and their risky withdrawals that can cause seizures. Benzodiazepines become more dangerous when combined with opioid drugs, and a study reported on by CNN found that 75 percent of benzodiazepine overdose deaths also involve opioid use.

Seek Addiction Treatment to Overcome Abuse of Highly Addictive Substances

Drug abuse is a serious problem all over the world as people from all walks of life turn to psychoactive substances to cope with their struggles, and the more addictive a substance is, the greater the risk.

If you or a loved one is battling addiction, know that you are not alone and that treatment is available. Placeholder is a drug rehabilitation center that provides treatment for addiction to the substances mentioned in this list. Contact an addiction counselor today to learn more about your addiction treatment options.

Sources:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673607604644

https://www.drugabuse.gov/about-nida/legislative-activities/testimony-to-congress/2016/americas-addiction-to-opioids-heroin-prescription-drug-abuse

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/cocaine/what-scope-cocaine-use-in-united-states

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db273.pdf

https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/alcohol/facts-about-alcohol

http://www.cnn.com/2016/02/18/health/benzodiazepine-sedative-overdose-death-increase/index.html

extended addiction treatment

Benefits of Extended Addiction Treatment – 28 Days Isn’t Long Enough

When 28 Days Isn’t Long Enough; Extended Addiction Treatment Benefits

Drug and alcohol addiction can wreak havoc on a person’s life, sometimes for decades, and the societal cost is exponential: Conservative estimates place a $442 billion price tag on the economic impact of drug addiction. The number includes health care costs, criminal justice costs and loss of workforce hours.

Substance abuse can also negatively impact families and interpersonal relationships, and the cost of addiction in those cases is difficult to measure. The majority of addicts experience the onset of addiction before the age of 25, and the condition is typically a life-long struggle.

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The Numbers Around Addiction

What often begins as a way to unwind on the weekend can quickly turn sour. While concrete drug-related hospitalization numbers are hard to come by, data collected by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) shows an upward trend of ER visits related to drug and alcohol use from 2009 – 2011.

The estimated number of drug-related emergency room visits across the U.S. in 2011 was 1.52 million, with another 1.2 million hospitalizations where illicit drug use was reported. And as early as 2009, the World Heath Organization placed drug addiction on their top 10 list of preventable diseases with the highest overall cost.

But within the sobering data lies a possible solution: Extended addiction treatment may improve an addict’s chances of staying sober for the long haul. Extended treatment means a period of time lasting at least 90 days, a far cry from the traditional 28- or 30-day model used by many treatment facilities.

Why Does Addiction Treatment Fail?

Substance abuse is more than a social problem; addiction is recognized as a medical condition, but it’s often treated using psychological methods alone. This single-faceted approach to treatment is the primary reason why so many people who abuse drugs or alcohol remain addicted or stuck in a relapse-recovery cycle.

One of the biggest fallacies regarding the treatment of drug and alcohol addiction is the idea that relapse equals failure. Relapses occur for a number of reasons, most of them highly personal, but they are not indicative of treatment failure.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 40 – 60 percent of drug addicts relapse following treatment. That number dwindles in extended treatment settings, however, as addicts are continuously monitored and given a variety of resources that serve as alternatives to their addict lifestyle.

Benefits of Extended Addiction Treatment

Time plays a crucial role in addiction recovery: Among addicts seeking treatment or order to do so by a court or other legal entity, only about 10 percent receive treatment in a timely fashion, as reported by the U.S. News & World Report in 2016.

In addition, a large percentage of addicts are only involved in an active treatment program for a short time – typically one month, a time-frame that almost lends itself to failure, according to health care professionals. Even a 90-day treatment program may not even be a sufficient amount of time for substance abuse recovery, experts say. In fact, individuals dealing with opioid addiction may require methadone maintenance for years.

Drug addicts and alcoholics are often standoffish and demonstrate a lack of trust in regards to authority figures and clinicians, especially if addiction treatment is court ordered. Extended treatment, whether performed in an inpatient or outpatient setting, allows health care professionals an adequate period of time in which to develop a trusting, positive relationship with their patients.

How Successful is Extended Treatment?

Recovery rates among drug addicts and alcoholics are hard to measure, for several reasons. First, the definition of “rehab” is not standardized. To one addict, rehab could mean a self-administered, cold turkey method of detox. To another, the word is synonymous with a facility, such as an addiction center or hospital.

But no matter what rehab means to the individual addict, many experts agree that continual evaluation and follow-up treatment are the keys to overcoming substance abuse. Without active participation in a recovery or treatment program, it’s easy for an addict to fall back into old habits, especially during periods of stress or when experiencing a change in life.

In many cases, addicts fall into a cycle of treatment-relapse-legal problems that can seem impossible to overcome. But extended treatment at facilities such as Desert Cove Recovery has been shown to help a number of addicts and alcoholics escape the bondage of substance abuse. And when addicts break free from the crutch of addiction, they can begin to rebuild their lives, develop stronger interpersonal relationships and increase productivity both at work and within their household.

never drinking again

Another Sunday of “Never Drinking Again?”

Spending Another Saturday or Sunday Hungover? Weekend Binge-Drinking Is a Serious Issue

“Ugh, I feel awful. I’m never drinking again.”

How many times have you mumbled something similar after waking up with a hangover? You have good intentions when you claim you’re never going to drink again, so you believe your declaration of sobriety. Unfortunately, you find yourself dealing with the hangover/hungover cycle again next weekend…and the weekend after that.

It doesn’t have to be like this. You can break your weekend binge-drinking habit with help from supportive, compassionate people who understand your situation.

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What is binge drinking?

Binge drinking refers to heavy drinking that quickly raises a man or woman’s blood-alcohol content (BAC) to a percentage of 0.08 grams or higher. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this usually occurs when a woman has more than 4 alcoholic beverages or a man has more than 5 alcoholic drinks in a 2-hour period.

Binge drinking is common at parties, bars, and events centered around alcohol. Some adults mindlessly consume multiple drinks as they socialize, dance, or snack on appetizers. Other folks intentionally down alcoholic beverages during drinking games, such as beer pong or Quarters.

Does binge drinking each weekend make me an alcoholic?

Not all binge drinkers are alcoholics. The CDC states that approximately 90% of heavy drinkers do not have an alcohol use disorder. (Alcoholism is an example of an alcohol use disorder.) However, that does leave approximately 10% of heavy drinkers that DO have an alcohol use disorder.

Why is binge drinking bad?

There are numerous risks associated with excessive alcohol consumption, including:

  • Vehicular crashes
  • Abnormal and/or inappropriate behavior
  • Injuries
  • Alcohol poisoning

Drinking heavily may lower your inhibitions, making you more likely to engage in activities you would normally avoid. Some potential side effects of excessive drinking, such as liver damage and memory issues, may not appear immediately.

Can a teen have a binge-drinking problem?

Binge drinking affects people of all ages, including teens and preteens. One out of every 5 drinkers are under the age of 21, and 13% of underage drinkers admit they have had recent episodes of binge drinking.

What should I do if someone I love is a weekend binge drinker?

It’s difficult to watch a loved one battle hangovers or other unwanted side effects caused by binge drinking. If you’re concerned about a loved one’s drinking, don’t lecture her or criticize her actions. Invite her to attend alcohol-free events with you, and let her know that you’re happy to lend an ear if she ever wants to talk about her drinking. Don’t press the issue; you don’t want to push your loved one away.

How do I know if I’m drinking too much?

Ask trusted friends or family members how they feel about your drinking, but keep in mind that some loved ones may sugarcoat potential issues to avoid conflict. Make a list of how your drinking affects your life. It may help to track what, how much, and when you drink on a calendar.

After tracking your alcohol consumption, do you notice a pattern of hangovers, fights with your significant other, or missed shifts at work? These are all signs that your weekend drinking habits are impacting your life in a negative way.

If I have a problem with binge drinking, does that mean I have to give up drinking forever?

This is a common concern that people who consider giving up alcohol completely. It’s difficult to imagine an alcohol-free life, especially if your social outings or business meetings frequently involve alcoholic beverages or if those around you would not be willing to cut out alcohol during gatherings.

Some binge drinkers become dependent on alcohol, so they decide it’s best to adopt a sober lifestyle. There are also people who successfully modify their drinking habits without permanently giving up alcohol. An alcohol abuse specialist can help you decide if you should limit or eliminate alcohol consumption.

You can have fun without alcohol, but adjusting to sobriety takes time. If you decide to quit drinking, make sure you surround yourself with encouraging people who support your path toward sobriety. You deserve a happy, healthy and rewarding life.

happy life not hungover

google addiction treatment

Google Stops Addiction Treatment Sponsored Results

There have been stories in the news recently about Google making the decision to halt addiction treatment advertising. This may have slipped under your radar, or you may have noticed and figured that Google knew what they were doing since there have been reports of non-reputable rehabs also in the news. Unfortunately, Google didn’t only stop the ads from rehabs that aren’t legit. Google has instead stopped ALL addiction treatment center advertising, making it more difficult for a person looking for help to find it.

We agree that Google needed to make a change. There needs to be a better process for all medical advertising, but stopping all addiction treatment advertising during what people are calling an opioid epidemic was not the answer. More than 90 American die EACH day from an opioid overdose. Halting ads from reputable facilities that can help with this opioid crisis is not the way to help. Even worse, Google is continuing to sell advertisements to the pharmaceutical manufacturers that some are blaming the opioid problem on.

We need your help. Please sign the change.org petition to Google asking them to allow addiction treatment centers to advertise so that when someone looks for help, they can find it. If you would like more information, please visit FullCirlceSEM.com for the full story.

At Desert Cove Recovery, we are proudly accredited by The Joint Commission for National Quality Approval. We received accreditation in 2015 and met all National Patient Safety Goals. We offer referrals to reputable detox facilities and provide holistic therapies, extended care and outdoor therapies. Recovery is possible and we are here to help.

A Closer Look at Effects of Alcohol on Men and Women

Effects of Alcohol on Men and WomenScience is constantly evolving and shedding light on previous misconceptions or questions. And in the case of alcohol, a new study has shown how men and women react differently to the substance, specifically in their brains. After conducting a small group study on men and women who fit the criteria for heavy drinkers, but not alcohol abuse, the researchers were able to note a major difference between the two sexes in the type of receptors that were influenced when alcohol was consumed.

GABA receptors are responsible for shutting off brain activity, they are integral in preventing anxiety and problems with these receptors often lead to depression. There are two specific GABA receptors, GABA-A and GABA-B. GABA-A is thought to have more of a connection to drinking patterns, while GABA-B has been found to be responsible for the desire for alcohol.

“Generally, our work showed that alcohol causes more pronounced changes in both electrical and chemical neurotransmission in men than women. There are two types of GABA receptors, A and B. Long-term alcohol use affects neurotransmission through both types in males, but only one type, GABA-A, is affected in females,” explained Outi Kaarre, lead author of the study.

The findings were presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology conference earlier this month in France.

So, if men who are considered to be heavy drinkers show more activity in both A and B GABA receptors, while women who are drinkers only show activity in GABA-A receptors, what does this mean for alcohol medications and theories of addiction?

First of all, there are certain medications that have been designed to help alcoholics curb their cravings, but these medications have not reliably worked on women. This may be because the medications are geared to the GABA-B receptors, which do not appear to be a problem in female heavy drinkers. Secondly, this new information may shed more light on why women become heavy drinkers, and why men are more prone to becoming heavy drinkers, and the reasons may not be the same for both sexes.

Understanding this difference could change the approach to alcoholism treatment and medications, especially as science continues to advance in the understanding of the intricacies of our bodies and minds.

If you have a loved one struggling with alcohol abuse or alcoholism, contact Desert Cove today to find out more about our treatment program and how we can help.

opiates and alcohol

Why Opiates and Alcohol are Such a Deadly Combination for Arizona Drug Users

Overdosing From Combining Opiates and Alcohol Is a Real Risk 

Media reports frequently focus on cases of opiate use, with Governor Doug Ducey even declaring a state of emergency due to the sharp rise in opioid overdose among Arizona drug users. However, little attention was given to the dangers of mixing opiates and alcohol until news reports emerged that Cory Monteith’s death was caused by combined drug intoxication from champagne and heroin which shed light on the deadly drug combination of opiates and alcohol. Although under-reported, over 70 percent of opiate-related deaths involve the use of another substance, and alcohol is present in more than 50 percent of opiate fatalities. 

Alcohol Is a Depressant 

Alcohol’s ability to pass the blood-brain barrier allows it direct access to the GABA receptors and neurotransmitters of the central nervous system. These neurotransmitters are responsible for sending messages from the brain to every part of the body, including the limbs, muscles and organs. Alcohol blocks the nerve receptors’ messages, slowing down the central nervous system. As a result, bodily functions are altered. Changes in the body from alcohol consumption are felt and observed through a number of signs and symptoms:

– Altered speech.
– Difficulty walking. 
– Dulled senses.
– Illegible handwriting.
– Impaired hearing.
– Mental confusion.
– Memory lapses. 
– Poor coordination.
– Slow reaction times. 

Drugs That Are Classified As Opiates

Derived from the opium of poppy plants, opiates are a Schedule II substance that is prescribed to physical pain. When used as intended, opiates bind to the body’s opioid receptors, blocking pain signals. Opiates and opioids are two terms that are often used interchangeably. Opioid was a term that once was only used to describe synthetic opioids. However, the term opioid is now used to describe all four categories of opiates, which are the endogenous opioids made by the human body, opium alkaloids like codeine and morphine, semi-synthetic opioids such as oxycodone and heroin and fully synthetic opioids like methadone. 

Opiates Are Also a Depressant 

The human body contains naturally occurring opioid-like neurotransmitters and opioid receptors. While these organic substances send signals that block pain, the body does not make enough of its own opioids to stop severe pain or overdose itself. When someone takes opiate drugs, they easily bind to these receptors because they are similar in chemical structure to the body’s natural opioid neurotransmitters. However, opiate drugs do not act the same way as opioid neurotransmitters, which causes the transmission of abnormal messages throughout the body. Heroin’s impact on the body is dependent on a whole host of factors. These factors include the user’s current state of health, their weight, whether they are male or female. How the person takes opiates, how much opiates he or she takes, how long they have engaged in opiate use, the simultaneous consumption of other drugs or alcohol and their mental health also play a role on how heroin will affect the body. In terms of how opiate drugs interfere with these signals produces a variety of effects: 

– Confusion.
– Constipation.
– Drowsiness.
– Lack of coordination.
– Poor decision making.
– Sedation.
– Shallow breathing. 

The Effects of Combining Opiates and Alcohol

Since opiates and alcohol are both considered to be depressants, they can be a deadly drug combination when taken together. When someone takes an opiate and drinks alcohol, the opiate will increase the body’s absorption rate of the alcohol, increasing the likelihood of alcohol poisoning. Additionally, this mixture slows down brain functioning and subsequently, the body’s circulatory and respiratory systems. Signs and symptoms of an opiate-alcohol overdose include drowsiness, dizziness and slowed heart rate and breathing rate. Their heart can even stop beating. The longer someone engages in this type of polydrug use, they increase their chances of a fatal overdose

Why Arizona Drug Users Are Taking Opiate-Alcohol Cocktails

With such a high risk of death from consuming opiates and alcohol, it is surprising that the number of fatalities is so high. Often, people turn to this type of substance use to relax as opiates’ ability to cause the feeling of euphoria lasts longer when this drug is combined with alcohol. Other people choose to take both of these substances at the same time as an escape because the combo either makes them fall asleep for a long period of time or gives them a more intense high than taking opiates alone. 

This Dangerous Trend Is Running Rampant Among Youth

The results of 2012 study by McCabe and other researchers indicate that a significant portion of young people are mixing opiates with other substances, including opiates. Approximately 1 of 8 teenagers in high school have used opiates with for recreational purposes, and 70 percent of these teens are combining opiates with one or more substances. Although they are using opiates in conjunction with amphetamines, tranquilizers, marijuana and cocaine, 52.1 percent of teenagers from this study are also combining opiates with alcohol. 

More People Are Turning to Heroin 

Due to the alarming rate of prescription opioid abuse, authorities in Arizona and the rest of the country are taking a hardline approach to curbing the distribution of these medications. Therefore, people who are dependent or addicted to opiates are using heroin. Estimates by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health show that almost 700,000 people in America are using heroin, and approximately 170,000 people tried heroin for the first time in 2012. Looking at the rates from the 1960s to the 1970s when heroin reached its height of popularity, current heroin-use rates are on reaching the same level. Heroin users state that street heroin is easier to access that legitimate prescriptions and cheaper to buy than illicit prescription painkillers. 

addiction treatment centers

Things to Compare Among Residential Treatment Centers in Arizona

The Best Care Possible – A Comparison Among Rehab Centers In Arizona

Don’t make the mistake of believing that all residential treatment centers in Arizona are created equally. Your health and well being should be your primary concern. That means finding the best possible rehab in the state for your care. There are quite a few different rehab treatment centers in Arizona. It’s up to you to do the research and find the best one

How Do You Know Which Is Best?

You’ll notice that a lot of rehab centers look great on the surface. They might have well-designed websites and make plenty of bold claims. However, those are very minor considerations in the grand scheme of things. There are actually many different qualities you must compare among the inpatient treatment centers in Arizona. By comparing these qualities you can find the center that is best suited for you.

Compare Their Histories.

The past is always a great place to start your comparison. It’s safe to assume that most businesses will perform in the future the same as they have in the past. Therefore, if the rehab already has a seedy reputation for not helping its patients, then it’s a bad place to seek recovery. Every treatment center will have its own history and it’s not uncommon for there to be a slight blemish. This is especially true of the reviews you may find online.

Comparing Online Reviews.

Reviews are a very specific part of the treatment’s history that you should consider early on. If you are considering two or more rehab centers, then you should carefully compare as many reviews for the two as you can find. However, finding one or two negative reviews online isn’t a reason to completely shun a particular facility. Some people will have a bad experience no matter what. And, in some cases, people are paid to write false negative reviews. On the contrary, if a significant number of reviews are negative, then it’s probably best to avoid that particular facility.

Comparing Testimonials Is Similar.

You can think of testimonials as reviews that are always positive. Why bother comparing them if you know they are going to be positive? It’s important to compare the testimonials of residential treatment centers in Arizona because they provide you with a snapshot of a patient’s recovery. They are often very uplifting and encouraging. Testimonials let you know what is possible at a certain facility. Almost every rehab center will have testimonials available on their website. Compare all that you can find once you’ve moved on from reading reviews. It’s always a positive sign if you can find testimonials that closely relate to your own personal story and struggles.

Compare Their Track Record Of Success.

Perhaps the most important component of their history to consider is their track record of success. Does only 1 out of every 100 patients actually make a change? Some inpatient treatment centers in Arizona are little more than than vacation spots for people who have no real interest in changing. Those rehab centers don’t foster real growth within their patients and don’t push them to make the change. Obviously, that’s not what you are looking for if you’re interested in honestly kicking your bad habits or helping someone else kick theirs.

Compare The Programs They Offer At Present

Comparing the past is important, but so is comparing what they offer at the present. A prime example of this is comparing the various programs and services that they offer. Some facilities might only offer basic detoxification and release programs. Others will include a variety of different services that may better suit your needs. Programs might include:

– Alcohol and drug detoxification.

– Outdoor therapy.

– 12 step programs.

Compare Their Referral System.

It’s entirely possible that you will require additional services not offered at any of the residential treatment centers in Arizona that you are interested in. In that case, they will need to refer you to another company for those services. Compare the different referral systems put in place by each of the rehab centers you are considering. Some offer completely free referrals while others will actually try to charge for their recommendations. For example, you may find a treatment center that you really like, but they recommend that you receive a detox, which they do not offer. Ideally, the rehab will recommend a detox facility for free. You know that you can trust the recommendation because you have already put your trust in the rehab. But if they are trying to charge for that referral, then you should be skeptical.

Compare How Their Programs Work.

Five different rehabs may offer alcohol dependency programs with the exact same name, but that doesn’t mean they are actually the same program. The care professionals at the center will have implemented their own techniques and procedures to help you through the recovery process. It’s a good idea to read as much information as you can find about their procedures and how their programs work. You may find that you like everything about a particular rehab except how they hand their recovery process. For example, some rehab treatment centers in Arizona stick to a very strict daily regimen and schedule. Others will offer patients a much greater degree of flexibility and freedom. It’s up to you which you think will work best.

Compare Their Payment Options.

You can never overlook the cost of attending rehab. Surprisingly, some rehab centers don’t even accept insurance. Those are the rehabs that are meant to be more of a vacation than an actual place for recovery. A treatment center may not accept every single kind of insurance, but they should accept most of them. Compare the payment and insurance options of the various rehab centers you are considering before signing any contracts.

Research And Make A Decision.

Getting help is extremely important, but that doesn’t mean you can’t take time to do the research. Compare these many qualities among residential treatment centers in Arizona before making a commitment to get help at any one particular center. You’ll likely find that there is only one facility in the area that can meet all of your needs, has a positive history, accepts most insurances, and offers a variety of unique programs. That’s the treatment center that’s right for you.

Methamphetamine Use Rising Again

methamphetamine abuseMethamphetamine addiction was a major concern for law enforcement and health officials several years ago, before the opioid crisis reached epidemic proportions. States in the Western United States were hit especially hard by the abundance of methamphetamine being manufactured, and as a result thousands of people suffered from debilitating addictions to the powerful drug. But, after major attempts to curb methamphetamine production and use, the United States saw a decline in the number of meth users.

Restrictions on purchasing some of the main ingredients for manufacturing the drug and powerful ad campaigns like, Faces of Meth, were attributed to the de-escalation of methamphetamine use. However, recent reports find that while the country experienced a reprieve from the meth problem, more people are using the drug again, and massive quantities of the drug are being smuggled across the border.

“We’re seeing it pour across the border in bigger quantities. It used to be that loads of 20, 30, 40 pounds were big for us. Now we have 200-pound loads,” cautioned Mark Conover, the deputy U.S. Attorney in Southern California.

Methamphetamine originally soared in popularity because addicts could manufacture the drug themselves, using relatively common household ingredients. But, now that many of these ingredients require an ID to purchase and are only available in limited quantities, drug cartels in South America have taken over. As a result, methamphetamine is not being made in small at-home labs, but instead is being produced in giant warehouses where they make it in bulk and then smuggle it into the United States.

This massive influx of methamphetamine has led to some of the biggest numbers that officials have ever seen. States like Ohio, Texas, Montana, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Iowa, South Dakota and Wisconsin have all seen massive spikes in methamphetamine in the last year. Some reports show that methamphetamine use has jumped by 250% since 2011.

Meth has somewhat silently crept back on the radar. Despite having a different set of problems associated with its use where overdose deaths are less likely compared to opioids, methamphetamine addiction is still a very serious threat to the public health in America.

If you have a loved one who is abusing or addicted to methamphetamine, contact us today to find out how our treatment program can help.

The Rising Societal Costs of the Heroin Epidemic

Heroin EpidemicSome may think that drug abuse is a problem with only one victim – the user. However, their family members also suffer as well and society feels the effects in the form of dollars. According to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE, taxpayers shelled out more than $51 billion in 2015 to go towards the fall out of the heroin problem.

Incarcerations due to heroin abuse and the sale of the drug, treatment costs, treatment of infectious diseases caused by heroin use, cost of treating infants born addicted to heroin, loss of productivity at work and heroin deaths were all variables used to calculate the astronomical number. This record-breaking amount is like pouring salt in the wound of already having the highest number of overdose deaths.

The researchers went even further and determined how much each heroin user costs society. According to the data, a single heroin user can cost taxpayers as much as $50,799 a year. This is due to the above variables as well as the fact that heroin users are more likely to be unproductive, and have large blocks of time where they are not working or contributing to the economy.

Interestingly, patients with different chronic problems cost society much less. For instance, a person who is suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease costs society about $2,567 a year. And a person who has diabetes generally costs about $11,148 a year.

“The downstream effects of heroin use, such as the spread of infectious diseases and increased incarceration due to actions associated with heroin use, compounded by their associated costs, would continue to increase the societal burden of heroin use disorder,” explained Dr. Simon Pickard, one of the lead authors of the study from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Of course the research is not only to illustrate the burden heroin addiction has on society, it also indicates that effective treatment and prevention efforts are perhaps the only way to get this incredibly high number down. By getting more people the help they need, not only are we saving billions of dollars, but most importantly, we’re saving lives.