Category Archives: Arizona Drug Treatment

Monthly Injection Treatment for Opioid Addiction Approved by FDA

The FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) has approved a monthly treatment for addiction that is the first of its kind. The new option can be used for those struggling with substance abuse issues stemming from an addiction to narcotics such as prescription painkillers or heroin.

Sublocade, from Indivior Plc, is buprenorphine given by injection. The drug reduces the sensations of withdrawal symptoms in addiction patients. Administering the drug monthly could help patients comply to the treatment schedule, compared to other versions currently available such as daily oral doses in the form of pills or dissolving strips.

Effort to Reduce Stigmas Around Drugs

Approving the new drug treatment product is part of the Administration’s plan to reduce stigmas surrounding this class of medications. Buprenorphine is a synthetic opioid, and critics have expressed their opposition to medication assisted treatment (MAT). Instead, they favor changing users’ behavior to combat the current opioid crisis.

The FDA and other federal agencies are supporting MAT, which involves administering drugs and providing counseling to those affected. The White House referred to the situation as a “public health emergency” in October.

The FDA commissioner, Scott Gottlieb, released a statement recently that said the FDA is “committed to expanding access to treatments that can help people pursue lives of sobriety.”

New Medication Available Early in 2018

According to reports, Sublocade will be made available to patients early in 2018, according to Indivior. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that in 2016, drug overdoses were responsible for taking the lives of more than 64,000 Americans. This figure includes overdoses caused by prescription drugs, such as fentanyl and OxyContin, and illicit ones like heroin. Clients who receive medication assisted treatment for drug addiction reduce their risk of death from all causes in half, according to the FDA, making this option a valuable one.

Mr Gottlieb stated that the FDA is currently working on guidelines that will get further treatment options for treating opioid addiction into the market more rapidly.

FDA Approves Nerve Stimulator for Opioid Withdrawal

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given its approval for a specialized tool that will be used to help US patients addicted to prescription pain medications and get them off opioids.

The newly-approved device delivers electric pulses to the area behind the patient’s ear. This electric pulse triggers a current which travels to the person’s occipital nerves (the ones reaching from the spinal cord to the back of the neck) and cranial nerves. It functions as a PNFS (Percutaneous Nerve Field Stimulator) device system and stimulates the patient’s brain to mask opioid withdrawal symptoms.

This medical device has been named the NSS-2 Bridge (NSS stands for “Neurostimulation System”.) Research shows that when used over a five-day treatment period, the process can be effective. The device is used during the period when an opiate-dependent person is likely to experience the most intense pain, as well as body tremors and sweating, during withdrawal.

Seventy-three patients were involved in the trials to determine the device’s effectiveness. Close to one-third (31 percent) of the participants noticed a reduction in symptoms within half an hour of getting the device. The trial found that 64 of the patients got relief and were ready to move forward to medication-assisted therapy after using the device. This represented a success rate of 88 percent after the five-day trial. However, other applications may include permanent abstinence rather than switching to a maintenance drug.

The FDA has decided to approve the device, even though the results of the study are limited. Further trials will be undertaken to evaluate its effectiveness in various settings.

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb stated in his reasons for approving the new device that there is a need for finding new ways of helping people who are addicted so that they can achieve sobriety with “medically assisted treatment.” He went on to say that while research is continuing to find better medicines to treat opioid use disorder, medicine also needs to look to devices to help as well.

Finding alternative methods of treating opioid dependency is a major topic of discussion regarding dealing the epidemic our nation faces. In addition to helping people get off these drugs, it is imperative to find more ways to reduce or avoid using these highly addictive substances.

Compound May Offer Pain Relief Without Fear of Addiction

New research from Indiana University-Bloomington may give doctors and their patients living with pain a non-opioid option for treating severe pain.

Researchers conducted a pre-clinical study involving mice. They discovered that compounds known as PAMs (Positive Allosteric Modulators) heighten the effect of natural pain relievers the body produces internally when injured or exposed to stress. PAMs were first discussed with attendees at the 2016 Conference for the Society for Neuroscience, held in San Diego, California.

About PAM

The researchers chose a PAM that would intensify endocannabinoids. These two brain compounds (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) specifically act on the CB1 receptor that responds to the presence of THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. The PAM used in the study was GAT211, a molecule that coauthor Ganesh Thakur at Northeastern University created that had effects that concentrated on the brain.

The PAM increased the effects of the endocannabinoids without creating the undesired side effects associated with marijuana use. These include lowering of body temperature and clumsiness.

The pain relief achieved from PAM was more effective and lasted longer than when drugs were used that work by breaking down then metabolizing the brain’s cannabis-type compounds. Using PAM on its own means natural painkillers target the correct part of the brain as needed. The alternative is take drugs that bind to receptor sites throughout the body.

Increases the Body’s Natural Ability to Relieve Pain

Study leader Andrea G. Hohmann, a professor and chair of neuroscience at the University’s Department of Psychology and Brain Sciences, stated that the study revealed a PAM increases the body’s pain relieving ability without decreasing effectiveness over time. This is a key component of addiction; a person finds that they need to consume more of their drug of choice to experience the desired effect.

Professor Hohmann went on to say that she sees the research her team is doing as “an important step forward” in the goal to find new, non-addictive pain relievers.

The results of the study were published in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

Non-Addictive Painkillers Help Save Lives from Opioid Overdose

Continuing to find ways of providing pain relief for patients that don’t involve drugs with a high potential for abuse is of utmost importance in the battle against opioid addiction. Tens of thousands of lives are now lost each year due to overdoses and millions of people are abusing these drugs.

If you have a loved one who needs treatment help for a substance abuse problem, contact Desert Cove today for more information about our program.

Nearly Half of Americans Know Someone Addicted to Drugs

The results of a PEW Research Center survey found that 46 percent of American adults stated they knew of either a family member or a close friend who was

• Addicted to drugs; or
• Had been addicted previously.

There are no major differences in the numbers when sorted by race: white (46 percent), black (52 percent), Hispanic (50 percent) or gender (men and women are equally divided at 46 percent).

Substance Use Disorder

Researchers looked at federal government data to compile their findings. In 2016, approximately 7.4 million Americans (2.7 percent of the population) over the age of 12 met the criteria for illicit “drug use disorder” (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA).

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) doesn’t use terms like substance abuse and substance dependence to describe those who have issues with chemicals. Instead, it uses the term “substance use disorder.” The severity of the disorder is classified as being mild, moderate or severe based on the number of diagnostic criteria that each client meets.

Definition of Substance Use Disorder – A substance use disorder occurs when the repeated use of drugs or alcohol leads to a “significant impairment.” – a health issue, disability or a failure to meet responsibilities at home, work or school. The diagnosis of substance abuse disorder is made based on evidence of issues in a person’s social life, risky use, lack of control, as well as pharmacological criteria.

Substance use disorders include the following:

• Alcohol Use Disorder
• Opioid Use Disorder
• Cannabis Use Disorder
• Stimulant Use Disorder
• Hallucinogen Use Disorder
• Tobacco Use Disorder

Substance Use Statistics

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2016), 20.1 million people in the US over the age of 12 had a substance use disorder. Approximately 15.1 million had an alcohol use disorder and 2.1 million had an opioid use disorder.

The survey was a self-reporting one for participating households. The true figures may well be much higher. There is also an unmarked void for the tens of millions of Americans who take other kinds of prescription drugs and are dependent on them, whether they are needed or not. The opioid epidemic has shed light on the over-prescribing issue our nation faces, but the problem is by no means limited to painkillers.

Getting Help for a Drug or Alcohol Problem

One of the first things to do in order to help someone recover from a drug or alcohol problem is to locate an effective treatment program. Desert Cove Recovery is here to assist you by helping to answer your questions and learn more about the rehabilitation and recovery process.

Contact us today to speak with a treatment specialist who can help.

Searching for Addiction Treatment Help

Searching for and settling on the right treatment facility can be a daunting task for even the most skilled researchers. There are so many factors that need to be taken into account. How much does the rehab cost? Where is it? Will they accept my insurance? Will they address the other problems in life that may have preceded the drug and/or alcohol use?

Currently there are various ways to look for treatment options, with search engines such as Google being the most prominent, but it is mainly left to the family members or the addicts themselves to try and locate something. This can pose a problem for some families and even prevent addicts from getting the help they need if they are met with barriers such as running into predatory call centers, waiting lists, higher than usual financial obligations and more.

Earlier this month Google made an unprecedented move in this realm by removing paid ads from many addiction treatment related keywords. The problem, though, is that they also are preventing the good places from being able to advertise there as well. The restriction is reportedly being placed on tens of thousands of keywords and may continue to roll out over time.

Aside from going to a search engine, there aren’t many known resources that people can call and get help searching for rehabilitation programs and supporting services. One college professor and her graduate research assistant are seeking to change that, starting with compiling a list of all of their local resources.

The list encompasses all available treatment options for an addict, including hotlines, prevention services, sober living providers, rehab programs, other medical professionals, and more. The hope is that with one master list, someone searching for help can easily access it, as the goal is to streamline the process.

“My hope is that while we’re getting information to learn more about substance abuse and addiction services across [our area], we are also able to capture what the state of mental health resources are and then to provide resources that have been validated and new information,” explained Amitta Parker one of the lead researchers of the project.

However, this is just one local area. In order to provide comprehensive help to all of those in need, a nationwide master list would have to be constructed and maintained. This massive undertaking has been attempted by government entities like the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), but it is far from complete. In fact, many treatment facilities are left off the list and it is unclear how often the database is updated or what other resources are available as a clearinghouse.

The continued loss of lives from addiction makes it clear that we must do a better job connecting up those who are looking for help with the people and places that can provide the services they’re looking for. Maybe Google and SAMHSA could start to work together on such a massive project, and learn a thing or two from these local researchers.

A Closer Look at Effects of Alcohol on Men and Women

Effects of Alcohol on Men and WomenScience is constantly evolving and shedding light on previous misconceptions or questions. And in the case of alcohol, a new study has shown how men and women react differently to the substance, specifically in their brains. After conducting a small group study on men and women who fit the criteria for heavy drinkers, but not alcohol abuse, the researchers were able to note a major difference between the two sexes in the type of receptors that were influenced when alcohol was consumed.

GABA receptors are responsible for shutting off brain activity, they are integral in preventing anxiety and problems with these receptors often lead to depression. There are two specific GABA receptors, GABA-A and GABA-B. GABA-A is thought to have more of a connection to drinking patterns, while GABA-B has been found to be responsible for the desire for alcohol.

“Generally, our work showed that alcohol causes more pronounced changes in both electrical and chemical neurotransmission in men than women. There are two types of GABA receptors, A and B. Long-term alcohol use affects neurotransmission through both types in males, but only one type, GABA-A, is affected in females,” explained Outi Kaarre, lead author of the study.

The findings were presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology conference earlier this month in France.

So, if men who are considered to be heavy drinkers show more activity in both A and B GABA receptors, while women who are drinkers only show activity in GABA-A receptors, what does this mean for alcohol medications and theories of addiction?

First of all, there are certain medications that have been designed to help alcoholics curb their cravings, but these medications have not reliably worked on women. This may be because the medications are geared to the GABA-B receptors, which do not appear to be a problem in female heavy drinkers. Secondly, this new information may shed more light on why women become heavy drinkers, and why men are more prone to becoming heavy drinkers, and the reasons may not be the same for both sexes.

Understanding this difference could change the approach to alcoholism treatment and medications, especially as science continues to advance in the understanding of the intricacies of our bodies and minds.

If you have a loved one struggling with alcohol abuse or alcoholism, contact Desert Cove today to find out more about our treatment program and how we can help.

Most Abused Drugs in Arizona

The Most Abused Drugs in Arizona and Their Effects

Arizona Sees a Rise in Deaths From the State’s Most Abused Drugs 

Drug use in Arizona has reached alarming numbers. By compiling statistics from the Centers for Disease Control, HealthGrove discovered that 20 out of 100,000 Arizonans are dying from drug poisoning. This makes Arizona the number-two state for fatal drug overdoses in the United States. With a 7 percent hike in overdose deaths from the year prior to this report’s release, it seems these fatalities will continue to rise. Faced with an urgent need to prevent the use of dangerous drugs in Arizona, Governor Doug Ducey created a 30-member Substance Abuse Task Force that will focus on early intervention and increased education. 

The Most Abused Drugs in Arizona 

Researcher James Cunningham from the University of Arizona reviewed multiple sources to create a comprehensive report on drug trends in Maricopa County. During his 2013 analysis, he found that the most abused drugs in Arizona are methamphetamine, heroin, marijuana and cocaine. Treatment and hospital admissions for cocaine use have decreased by 5%, making cocaine the fourth most used illicit drug. However, treatment and admissions numbers have increased significantly for other drugs; 23 percent of treatment cases are related to methamphetamine, 19 percent of cases are due to heroin and morphine and 17 percent are attributed to marijuana. 

Methamphetamine

Classified as a stimulant, methamphetamine causes the body to release extra dopamine, which leads to the pleasurable effect that users crave. However, elevated levels of dopamine may eventually change the brain’s structure, impairing verbal learning, reducing motor speed and creating permanent emotional and memory problems. Besides euphoria, abnormal wakefulness, convulsions, decreased appetite, hyperthermia, increased respiration and a rapid heartbeat are short-term effects of methamphetamine abuse. Chronic users of methamphetamine will build a tolerance to the drug, needing more of it to achieve the same desired effect. There are also effects from long-term use of this drug:

– Anxiety.
– Confusion.
– Delusions.
– Hallucinations.
– Insomnia.
– Paranoia.
– Violent behavior. 

Heroin

Processed from morphine, heroin is an opioid that is diluted with household substances such as starch, and powdered milk. When heroin reaches the brain, it quickly binds to the brain’s opioid receptors, causing an intense rush of pleasure, flushed skin, a dry mouth and sometimes nausea and itching. Once these effects wear off, users experience drowsiness, a decreased heart rate and shallow breathing. Slowed respiratory function carries the risk of coma, brain damage and even death. Several scientific studies have found that long-term heroin abuse deteriorates the brain’s white matter, affecting how users tolerate stress, control their behavior and make decisions. 

Marijuana

Marijuana is a hallucinogenic plant that contains a psychoactive chemical called delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. Depending on whether the user smokes or consumes marijuana, the effects are felt within several minutes to 1 hour. These effects vary between users and plant strains, but common effects include heightened senses, an increased appetite, euphoria and a sense of relaxation. On the other end of the spectrum, marijuana users may experience anxiety, paranoia, panic or even acute psychosis. After years of smoking or ingesting marijuana, people may suffer from memory impairment, a decline in cognitive abilities and reduced verbal ability.

Cocaine

By stopping neurotransmitter transporters from reabsorbing dopamine, cocaine creates an accumulation of dopamine. This buildup causes extreme euphoria and pleasure. Since cocaine is a stimulant, users appear hypersensitive to stimuli, talkative and energetic. They may also have dilated pupils, an elevated body temperature and an increased heart rate. Nosebleeds and hoarseness are also two typical problems that occur from cocaine use. Cocaine is one the most dangerous drugs in Arizona because with prolonged abuse, users may experience anxiety, convulsions, irritability, erratic behavior, panic attacks and psychosis. There are more effects that are more severe in nature:

– Cardiac arrest.
– Coma. 
– Heart rhythm disturbances. 
– Seizures.
– Strokes.
– Sudden death.

A False Sense of Security From the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act 

Ten years after the passage of the federal Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005, the Drug Enforcement Agency reported no instances of methamphetamine lab seizure in Arizona. While this statistic looks promising on paper, the 6,400 pounds of methamphetamine seized in 2015 suggest that the threat of rampant methamphetamine abuse is real, especially considering that this amount has increased by a staggering 294 percent in the last 5 years. Since this act limits the number of pseudoephedrine purchase to 9 grams per month, domestic methamphetamine production has sharply declined. Instead, foreign traffickers are supplying most of America’s methamphetamine supply. 

Methamphetamine and Heroin Are Coming in Droves From Mexico

Dangerous drugs in Arizona are transported through the Nogales and San Luis points of entry. Last year, the United States Customs and Border Protection agency made a 387-pound methamphetamine bust in Nogales, which is the largest seizure at this border crossing to date. Statewide, over 1,200 pounds of heroin were confiscated in 2015, which was more than double of the Arizona’s heroin-seizure count from 2013. Doug Coleman of the Phoenix DEA estimates that Mexican cartels are responsible for 90 percent of the methamphetamine flow and 80 percent of the heroin distribution in the United States. However, Mexico’s cocaine distribution has shifted to Europe where the drug nets higher profits since American stimulant users are attracted to the inexpensiveness of methamphetamine in comparison to cocaine. 

Prescription Painkiller Users Are Turning to Heroin 

To combat the misuse of Schedule II hydrocodone and oxycodone prescription painkillers, lawmakers have put prescription writing and filling restrictions on physicians and pharmacists. Now, these medications are more difficult for opioid abusers to obtain. Because prices are not inflated by pharmaceutical companies and heroin is often diluted with dirt-cheap ingredients, heroin is also less costly than opioid medications. Depending on the location, one heroin dose can cost $10 in contrast to $60 or more per opioid pill. Seeing the demand for heroin among opioid users in the United States, many people living in Mexico feel that heroin production is a way out of poverty. Therefore, they are transporting an abundance of heroin to the United States, contributing to the growing volume of drug use in Arizona. 

The Legalization of Medical Marijuana

In 2010, Arizona made medical marijuana legal. As of 2017, the Arizona Department of Health Services reported that approximately 120,000 residents have a medical-marijuana card. However, passing Proposition 203 also paved the way for people to illegally profit from medical marijuana. For instance, Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office raided three houses in 2012 and discovered $20,000 in cash along with 33 pounds of harvested marijuana and 107 marijuana plants. The growers responsible for this operation were giving out fraudulent patient cards and caregiver cards to their customers. Investigators from the MCSO approximated that this sized operation could garner operators $1 million every year. Considering the lucrativeness of illegal medical-marijuana operations, these ventures may lead to a future increase in marijuana abuse.

arizona recovery centers

Top Qualities of Alcohol Treatment Centers in Arizona

What Sets The Best Arizona Recovery Centers Apart?

Anyone who thinks that rehab is a vacation has clearly never been through rehab. The best alcohol treatment centers in Arizona will try to make sure that you’re as comfortable as possible throughout your stay. They will try to surround you with supportive, compassionate, well-trained people, and they’ll make sure that you have plenty of options to stay busy while you go through recovery. However, it’s going to be a lot of hard work. That’s why so many people are hesitant to take that step. It is because recovery is such a big job that the better alcohol rehab centers in Arizona will pull out all the stops to make the process just a bit easier and safer. It’s still a heck of a fight, but it’s just a bit easier with the right people on your side.

What Are You Looking For?

Not every facility is going to be equipped to walk with you through the entire journey of recovery. There are alcohol recovery centers in Arizona that only provide services for those nearing the end of the path. For instance, they might not offer detox. You might be at the start of the journey or closer to the finish line (of recovery at least. We all know that combating alcoholism is a lifelong fight), but along the way you might need one or all of the following forms of support:

It Starts With Detox

Whether the detox is handled in house or through a referral system, this is one of the first steps for most people struggling with alcoholism. Quitting alcohol cold turkey can be dangerous if your body has developed a certain level of dependence on booze. A detox program in a safe environment with trusted professionals can help you to end your chemical dependency without the crash landing.

12 Step Programs Are For Everyone Who Needs Them

You might have heard that 12 steps are kind of a religious thing. Not necessarily. For many, faith in God can be a vital component to recovery. But you can follow a 12 step program as an atheist, a Buddhist, or an agnostic without having to rethink your stance on faith and religion. With a 12 step program you have to hand some control over to a “power greater than yourself.” This is what you’ve already been doing with addiction. You just need to put something healthy in its place, be it God, your family, your career, whatever it is that you believe in and that gives you strength.

Holistic Treatment: Addressing Everything

Essentially holistic treatment is all about addressing the mental, physical and spiritual problems that led you to alcohol in the first place. Alcoholism isn’t like a rash that you can clear up with an ointment. It’s a symptom of something bigger.

Extended Care And Outdoor Therapy

There is also extended care to consider. Some of us need a little more work than others. No two addictions are the same. Simple as that. Likewise, you have outdoor therapy. What’s the point of living in Arizona if you’re going to stay indoors all day? Being a recluse is now way to kick an addiction, so a rehab center that gets you out in the fresh air, in front of the gorgeous mountain vistas now and then, that’s a must if you’re looking for a facility in Arizona.

Is That All There Is To It?

What we’ve laid out above, that’s just a list of services you’re going to find in the pamphlet of any alcohol rehab centers in Arizona worth putting on the “maybe” list. It’s not unheard of for a center to provide all of these services and still have a fairly low success rate. There’s more to it than that. We’re not just talking about an auto garage and the services they offer, we’re talking about a center that you’re going to call home for however long it takes to get well, and we’re talking about people who you’re going to be spending more time with than you may spend with your own family. So there’s quite a bit more to it than checking the above-listed items off on your clipboard. So what else is there?

-The people. This is the big thing. Compassionate, experienced, professional people can make the road to recovery a lot smoother. People who are difficult, who are treating this like any other dayjob, can make the road rockier than it needs to be.

-The location. It’s a good idea to seek recovery close to home. Familiar settings can help to provide some comfort as you settle into your new environment. A setting that is pleasant and inviting can go a long way, as well.

-A good success rate. No recovery center has a 100% success rate. They’re here to help, but success comes down to the individual, and some individuals are better than others at sticking to their recovery.

How Do You Know?

The only way to really find the best rehab center is to do your research and make a few calls. If you get us on the phone or send us an email, we’ll be happy to answer any questions you might have on our facility, our staff, and the services we offer. If you decide that we’re the right choice for your recovery, we’ll gladly help you through every step of the way. If you wind up settling on a different facility, we’ll wish you luck all the same. This is your journey to take, it’s your recovery, and it’s your health we’re talking about. We’d love to be the people who help you towards recovery, but you have to pursue whatever path it is that you feel is right, whatever path you feel is going to help you to get where you’re going.

dual diagnosis treatment centers

Dual Diagnosis Treatment Centers Are The Ideal Solution When Rehab Isn’t Enough

Dual Diagnosis Treatment Centers Are The Ideal Solution When Rehab Isn’t Enough

Many people who suffer from drug or alcohol addictions also suffer from some sort of mental illness. The two aren’t necessarily related, but one can often worsen the other. For example, a person may start drinking to deal with the symptoms of a particular mental issue. This drinking causes the symptoms of the mental condition to become even worse, which leads to more drinking. It’s a very destructive cycle and many people don’t even know that it’s happening.

Is There A Solution?

It might seem like going to rehab for a couple of months would solve the problem, but rehab alone often isn’t enough. This is especially true when the person drinks excessively or abuses drugs because of something related specifically to their mental issue. The only reliable solution is to treat the substance abuse and the mental illness at the same time. That is where dual diagnosis treatment centers in Arizona come into play.

What Is Dual Diagnosis In Arizona?

A dual diagnosis center is a facility that treats mental health and alcohol addictions (or drug addictions) at the same time. These two services have traditionally been split between different facilities. The problem with that approach is that the person might leave rehab and then begin abusing drugs again before their mental condition can be treated. Prior to the rise of dual diagnosis treatment centers in Arizona, it was nearly impossible for a patient to have their mental health and drugs addiction treated at the same time.

The Benefits Are Obvious.

A dual diagnosis center is an ideal solution if a patient suffers from a mental condition and a substance abuse problem. As a matter of fact, it may be the only way that the person can ever achieve a full and lasting recovery. The approach to recovery in these treatment centers is somewhat different than what you would expect from a traditional rehab center. There’s a lot more going on behind the scenes than just the basic twelve steps. The patient’s mental and emotional needs are very carefully considered, addressed, and treated.

A Step Above The 12 Steps.

There’s no denying that the 12 steps have helped millions of people deal with their addictions. However, the steps were created in the 1930’s and there was very little understanding of complex psychological problems at the time. The underlying science behind addiction and how it related to mental conditions were not fully understood. Therefore, the 12 steps do little, if anything, to address the psychological issues that can result in a drug dependency. A dual diagnosis center can still implement the 12 steps or a variation of them, but it does so with the aid of psychological and pharmaceutical tools as well.

Custom Recovery Programs Benefit Patients.

Dual diagnosis treatment centers in Arizona work with patients in all states of mental health and alcohol addiction. They must create extremely personalized recovery programs for each and every patient. In a way, this makes a dual diagnosis program more ideal than a traditional rehab even for a patient without a mental condition. Because every patient who stays at a dual diagnosis center is receiving a treatment plan that was designed specifically for them.

The Follow Through Makes A Differences

It’s not uncommon for a rehab center to check a patient in and then have very little to do with them as they recover. Dual diagnosis in Arizona works very differently. Not only is the recovery program designed specifically for each individual patient, but the professionals who work at the recovery center spend a lot of time tracking the recovery and adjusting the program as needed. If something isn’t working, then they take notice and they make the necessary changes. 

Recovery Programs Built Around Proven Treatments.

The 12 steps aren’t the only way to treat the problems of an alcohol addict. There are multiple forms of therapy that have been tailored to address the underlying issues with addiction. One such line of therapy is known as cognitive behavioral therapy(CBT). This focuses on finding the habits that the addict associated with drinking and then rewiring how the brain thinks of those habits. It’s said that every addict has certain triggers that can lead to cravings. CBT can help identify these triggers and then return them to normal actions that are not associated with drugs or alcohol at all.

Helping Patients Understand Themselves.

Many patients who received a dual diagnosis had no idea they were suffering from a mental illness. That means that they likely have very little information regarding their specific condition, its symptoms, or how it can be influenced by drinking. Spending time at dual diagnosis treatment centers in Arizona serves as a learning experience for the patient. They learn about their specific condition and the various symptoms it has. For example, they may have suffered from anxiety or have serious panic attacks without actually knowing what was happening. After experiencing dual diagnosis in Arizona they have a full understanding of these symptoms and know how to react the next time they occur.

Getting The Right Medications.

Mental health and drugs do not work well together. When a patient who deals with both of these problems visits a traditional rehab they may be prescribed more medications to help overcome the addiction. Unfortunately, those medications may not work well with their mental condition. By visiting a dual diagnosis center they have the opportunity to receive the right medications. The doctors and therapists know more about the patient and can choose prescription drugs that are designed specifically for their conditions. That means the medications and the treatment are far more likely to succeed.

It’s The Ideal Solution.

If someone suffers from a mental condition and an addiction to drugs or alcohol, then dual diagnosis in Arizona is the ideal solution. It’s the only way they can receive the absolute best care possible. Dual diagnosis centers will implement a combination of recovery programs, therapy sessions, and medications that are all designed specifically for each individual patient.

If you, or someone you love has received addiction treatment that didn’t properly equip them in recovery, it’s possible that they need dual diagnosis treatment. For information or to speak with a counselor, please give us a call at Desert Cove Recovery today.

Drug Abuse Linked to Financial Problems

Unemployment can be a very unstable, scary time for people. Without the promise of work, many fall into a depression that is difficult to get out of. And now a new study shows that illicit drug use is also more common for people who are unemployed. Despite not having income, drugs are still being purchased and used at higher rates than people who have steady work.

A new study released by researchers in the Netherlands shows that they psychological stress of not having a job is more powerful than reduced or no income, and the stress is what causes people to seek out drugs and alcohol. The researchers focused on 17 different types of reports from several different countries. Ten of the reports were composed of information from the American workforce. After reviewing all the data, the team was surprised that the psychological factors were a more powerful motivator for drug use than lack of money was for deterring a person from using drugs. And in extreme cases where money was an issue, many users simply switched their drug of choice to a cheaper alternative, but still maintained their drug-using lifestyle.

“In our literature review, we were particularly interested in the mechanisms that explain the relationship between unemployment and illegal drug use. We found supportive evidence for one of the mechanisms that we hypothesized. It seems that unemployment increases psychological distress and that distress increases illegal drug use,” explained Dr. Gera Nagelhout, the lead author of the study that was published in the International Journal of Drug Policy.

Nagelhout suggests that more funding and research focus on the psychological effects of unemployment so as to better help those who find themselves without employment. Forging a new path between unemployment and better mental health could be imperative in preventing these people from leading a life of drug use and addiction. As the country continues to struggle with ways to prevent the painkiller and opioid epidemic from claiming more lives, this is one area where more research and understanding is needed.