Tag Archives: opioids

effect of sugar in addiction recovery process

Effect of Sugar In Addiction Recovery Process

Effect of Sugar In Addiction Recovery Process

It’s long been a common practice to help those recovering from an addiction to using replacement therapy. For instance, when assisting smokers in quitting, practitioners will often prescribe low-doses of nicotine products to wean someone off of cigarettes altogether eventually. This is sometimes even a practice in alcohol use disorders, with the ultimate goal to be abstaining from alcohol altogether. It’s also not uncommon to use sugar in addiction recovery, as it’s often thought to be a harmless replacement.

But what happens when we try to replace one addiction with another substance? It may be as highly addictive, but seemingly innocuous when compared to alcohol or drug misuse and addiction. Are you, in effect, creating a new dependency when you use sugar in addiction recovery? There has been a log of research on the connection between sugar and addictive behaviors. If you’re looking for sobriety, sugar is most likely not the best recovery plan.

Sugar In Addiction Recovery: Rewarding Surviving

There’s a fair amount of research available about the effects of sugar on your brain. Dopamine is a ‘feel-good’ chemical that is released in your body when you experience something pleasurable. It’s released when you eat food you enjoy, engage in sexual activity, enjoy music at a favorite concert, and even when you participate in drug use. Dopamine makes you feel good, and research suggests that eating sugary foods produces dopamine in your body. Your brain uses dopamine as a reward for reinforcing behaviors that it believes are important to survival. Some of these behaviors are eating foods in high protein for nutrition, sexual activity for procreation, etc. In essence, the dopamine is an encouragement chemical so that you continue engaging in the behavior.

Unfortunately, that dopamine release happens regardless of whether an activity or substance is good for us. Research has found high-levels of dopamine may lead to increased risk-taking behavior. When it comes to the effect of sugar in addiction recovery, it can lead to unhealthy body habits, obesity, diabetes, and more.

Sugar can be as much as eight times as addictive as cocaine is. So, when you replace alcohol with sugar, you may just be replacing one dangerous addiction with another.

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Effect of Sugar in Addiction Recovery Process

How Sugar And Alcohol Are Connected

Lou Lebentz is a specialist in addiction, trauma, eating disorders, and addictions. She says that replacing alcohol with sugar is dangerous because alcohol is sugar and hits the same part of the brain that alcohol does. Because it also causes the release of dopamine, like alcohol, sugar can cause you to crave more. This can cause you to continually try to keep up with the reward center in your brain for that ‘high’ that comes with both alcohol consumption and sugar intake.

She also says that nutritionally speaking, sugar is not beneficial in any way. It has no nutritional content, and it is thought to be toxic to your body. She believes it can be especially dangerous for someone who suffers from alcohol misuse or addiction because you already have an overworked liver. Since sugar is part fructose, your body processes it in the liver. Lebentz says that there is a global epidemic of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), and she believes that this is because of the consumption of sugar. NAFLD can cause cirrhosis of the liver, just as alcohol misuse can, so replacing alcohol with sugar can still do similar damage to your body.

Desperately Seeking Sugar

When you want to achieve sobriety, you don’t want to do so by creating a new addiction. If you meet your cravings with sugar, you may inadvertently be creating a new dependency to maintain similar ‘high’ feelings. It’s natural for your brain to crave that euphoric feeling, but you don’t want to replace one addiction with another to recreate it. There are other ways to achieve sobriety without using sugar in the addiction recovery process. Desert Cove Recovery can help you do so in a holistic approach that treats your physical and emotional cravings.

You can achieve long-term sobriety without replacing one addiction for a different addiction. Desert Cove Recovery’s alcohol recovery program is individualized to treat your mind, body, and spirit. Desert Cove Recovery knows that you need a customized plan to help you recover from alcohol misuse. They compassionately employ an effective 12-step program combined with individualized and group therapies to address the roots of your addiction, as well as healthy strategies for battling it.

Create New Healthy Habits, Not New Addictions

Desert Cove Recovery’s facilities are in beautiful Scottsdale, Arizona. It’s an intimate setting that allows you to be serious about your sobriety and focus on getting healthy, not creating new habits and addictions that are not good for you.

Most importantly, alcohol addiction prevents you from living the life you were meant to live. Though it’s easily accessible and perhaps not as socially isolating, sugar in addiction recovery can chain you down in a different way. Desert Cove Recovery has the experience you need to help you break the bonds of addiction.

If you’re struggling with addiction, contact Desert Cove Recovery. They’re waiting to walk with you on the path to full sobriety and freedom.

Outpatient Addiction Rehabs Arizona

Outpatient Addiction Rehabs Arizona

Outpatient Addiction Rehabs Arizona

When you or someone you love has an addiction problem, realizing the need for help is the first and most challenging step. Once you admit you have a problem and commit to getting help, you must choose the right rehab program for you. Since each person’s addiction is different, their path to recovery will also be unique. Some patients benefit from inpatient rehab while others see better results with outpatient addiction rehabs Arizona. Let’s take a look at what someone should expect and what they should look for in an outpatient rehab center.

What Can I Expect from Outpatient Addiction Rehabs Arizona?

Unlike rehab programs where people live at a treatment facility, outpatient programs allow individuals to live at their homes and come to a facility for treatment. If you’re thinking of exploring this route, you can expect the following as you enter a program:

Be prepared to answer questions.

For rehab to be successful, those treating you need to know as much about you and your addiction as possible. Answering questions about how often you drink or use drugs is a must. If you’re not honest, you can’t expect to see great results. Before you enter an outpatient program, you will also be asked to take a drug test and complete a physical exam.

Be prepared to talk about what led to your addiction.

You need to be willing to open up and talk about any issues that may have led you to abuse drugs or alcohol. Many times the root of the addiction needs to be tackled so that you can get sober and learn to live a sober life.

Learn how to set boundaries.

In an inpatient rehab facility, you are essentially “closed off” to the rest of the world and the temptations that exist. In an outpatient addiction rehab setting, you may still encounter temptations.

An effective outpatient addiction rehab will teach you to effectively set boundaries that will help you as you navigate sobriety. Limiting the time you spend with certain people and in certain places may have to be one of those boundaries.
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What are the Benefits of Outpatient Addiction Rehab?

There are many benefits to choosing outpatient addiction rehab. Besides many outpatient programs being less expensive than in-house programs, you can also benefit in these ways:

You can continue your routine. You don’t need to take time off of work or school to get help. Many people still go to work or school every day and get the treatments they need. Maintaining a routine can help you to make the transition to sobriety easier because you learn to balance the real world with your road to sobriety at the same time.

You can get the support of family and friends. Getting sober takes a lot of support from family and friends. With outpatient rehab, that support can be available daily.

You may have more privacy. You won’t have to take off large amounts of time from work to attend outpatient rehab. So, you don’t need to explain your situation to your employer if you don’t want to. You can be discreet as you go to rehab if you choose.

Get the Help You Need

The need for outpatient addiction rehab centers is great in Arizona as statistics rank Arizona 8th for states with the largest drug problem. Desert Cove Recovery provides excellent outpatient addiction rehab that individuals need to get sober and to live a sober life.

Desert Cove Recovery realizes that every patient’s addiction is different, so every person’s recovery plan must be unique as well. There is an Intensive Outpatient Program available that includes group sessions as well as one-on-one sessions. Due to Desert Cove Recovery’s location in Scottsdale, Arizona, patients can take advantage of equine therapy, which has shown to reduce stress and addiction triggers.

If you’re ready to begin your path to sobriety, call Desert Cove Recovery today.

Long-term Dental Study to Determine Whether OTC Meds as Effective as Opioids

Long-term Dental Study to Determine Whether OTC Meds as Effective as Opioids

Rutgers University School of Dentistry will be heading a long-term study looking at whether non-addictive pain medications (acetaminophen and ibuprofen – OTC meds) are as effective as opioids after dental work. The National Institute of Health will be spending close to $12 million to fund the research, which will take place over several years and involve approximately 1,800 of the dental school’s patients.

Potential for Abuse Present with Opioids

Dr. Joseph Wineman, the former president of the Southern Nevada Dental Association, said he hopes the study will lead to some useful results. He noted that “[O]pioids always present the potential for prescription abuse.”

Dr. Wineman used the example of a patient who will find that one tablet isn’t providing the expected level of pain relief. That patient will then take five tablets, thinking that if one isn’t working “properly,” then increasing the dose must be the right solution.

He also stated that even the most painful dental procedures shouldn’t open up the door to drug dependency. Dr. Wineman said that having wisdom teeth removed shouldn’t be the cause of drug addiction unless a patient “goes overboard” and takes all the medication they have.

Dentists Talk to Patients About Pain Management & OTC Meds

The University of Las Vegas School of Dentistry teaches students and residents how to communicate with patients about appropriate pain management following common procedures such as tooth extractions, root canals or oral surgery. Part of the dentist’s scope of practice includes interviewing the patient and evaluating their level of pain, according to Dr. John Gallob, the Director of Faculty Dental Practice. He says that when pain medication is used appropriately, the likelihood of a dental patient becoming addicted is “incredibly rare.”

Dr. Wineman pointed out that dentists can check the Pharmacy Management Program (PMP) to ensure that a patient isn’t abusing potentially addictive pain medications. The PMP will tell the dentist whether their patient already has a prescription for opioids and if he recently picked up one for a certain number of pills. The dentist can prescribe pain medication for the dental procedure accordingly.

ADA Policy Recommends Non-opioid Pain Medications

Since 2011, the American Dental Association (ADA) has worked with its members to raise awareness about the potential harm that opioids can cause to dental patients and their families. It states that a growing number of studies support its policy that dentists should consider prescribing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), either on their own or in combination with acetaminophen, as opposed to opioids as the first choice for acute pain management.

Long-acting Buprenorphine Injections Effective Opioid Addiction Treatment

Long-acting Buprenorphine Injections Effective Opioid Addiction Treatment

A monthly injection of buprenorphine BUP-XR is more effective than a placebo for treating opioid addiction, according to the results of a new study. This formulation is the extended release version.

A daily dose version of buprenorphine was approved by the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) in 2002. It has been an effective treatment for opioid use disorder. Daily doses mean patients must commit to taking it each day; they may start to experience cravings for opioids once they get close to the end of the 24-hour cycle when they can take more medication.

Medication Assisted Therapy and Treatment for Opioid Addiction

Buprenorphine and methadone are both used in MAT (Medication Assisted Therapy) to treat opioid addiction. These medications are used in combination with behavioral counseling as part of a “whole patient” approach. The medications are used to control cravings and clients work with a counselor to develop new ways of thinking and responding to life stresses.

Extended Release Buprenorphine Called Sublocade

The extended-release version of buprenorphine was approved by the FDA in November 2017, which is being marketed under the brand name Sublocade. Approval was based on positive results in a Phase III human subjects study. The study has been published in The Lancet to make it available to the wider scientific community.

Double-Blind Study Conducted

Researchers divided 200 participants in the randomized, double-blind study into three groups. All of them had a mean duration of opioid use of between 11 and 12 years. Two of the groups were given different monthly doses of BUP-XR and one was given a placebo.

Both groups who were given BUP-XR reported “substantial portions of participants” abstaining from opioids. They also experienced relief from opioid withdrawal symptoms and control from cravings for opioids without having to take medication on a daily basis.

breakthrough in measuring pain may help to reduce opioid crisis

Breakthrough in Measuring Pain May Help Reduce Opioid Crisis

Breakthrough in Measuring Pain May Help Reduce Opioid CrisisResearchers at Indiana University’s School of Medicine have developed a blood test that identifies biomarkers in the blood which can help to determine the severity of a patient’s pain. The results could potentially help doctors to accurately measure pain on a scale. Some people believe this breakthrough in measuring pain may help reduce opioid addiction and ultimately the opioid crisis.

Currently, doctors must rely on their patients’ accounts of the amount of pain they are experiencing and suggest a treatment plan accordingly. A more accurate way to measure pain could lead to better treatment options for patients.

Breakthrough in Measuring Pain: Researchers Developed Prototype for Blood Test for Pain

The study was led by Alexander Niculescu, MD, Ph.D., a psychiatry professor, and was published in the Nature journal Molecular Psychiatry. Hundreds of participants were tracked to find biomarkers in the blood to that can help doctors to objectively determine how much pain a patient is experiencing. This blood test, which is the first of its kind, would also help doctors to understand a patient’s long-term prognosis.

The blood test can objectively tell doctors whether a patient is experiencing pain and how severe the pain is. It’s important to have an objective way to measure this symptom since until now the feeling of pain has been subjective. Physicians have to rely on what patients tell them about their pain or whatever clinical observations they can make to determine their patients’ pain levels. This blood test promises to give doctors a tool to treat and prescribe medications more appropriately for people experiencing pain.

Biomarkers in Blood Help Doctors Assess Pain Levels

The researchers looked at biomarkers in the blood. These biomarkers work in a similar manner to the way glucose is a biomarker to diabetes; they let doctors assess the severity of their patient’s pain and then provide appropriate treatment. It’s hoped this prototype may alleviate the problems that have contributed to the current opioid crisis.

The goal of pain management is to match the patient with the medication that is going to provide the best level of relief with the fewest side effects. Dr. Niculescu points out that through precision health, by having “lots of options geared toward the needs of specific patients, you prevent larger problems, like the opioid epidemic, from occurring.”

The study experts on the team found biomarkers that match with non-addictive drugs for treating pain and can also help to predict when patients may experience pain going forward. They will assist doctors in determining if a patient is experiencing chronic pain which may result in future Emergency Room visits.

Further research will focus on establishing whether there are some markers for specific conditions, such as headaches or fibromyalgia, or for ones that work better for men or women.

detox on your own, arizona detox

Why It’s Dangerous to Detox on Your Own; Arizona Detox Centers Provide Professional Assistance

Why It’s Dangerous to Detox on Your Own; Arizona Detox Centers Provide Professional Assistance

It is commendable to take the first steps towards overcoming an addiction. However, it can be very dangerous to detox on your own, which is why it’s important to use an Arizona detox provider that has medical professionals on hand to assist with the process.

Those who have become addicted have been experiencing dopamine hits to the brain provided a relief from the stresses of their lives. However, what ended up happening was so much worse than what they had been trying to avoid. Now, their primary concern is getting the brain and the body used to sober living again.

However, the process to get there involves reversing what occurred, pulling away from the effects that caused the addiction to take hold. This time is generally filled with quite a bit of anguish and discomfort. Of course, it is very much worth it in the end, but getting there is not easy, and it should not be done alone for comfort and, more importantly, safety reasons.

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So, Why Is It Dangerous to Detox on Your Own?

In many cases, not checking into an Arizona detox center during this part of the recovery process results in dangerous physical symptoms such as seizures without any professional help nearby to assist. It should also be noted that delirium tremens, which consist of a rapid heartbeat and a sense of confusion, occur in many who are recovering from alcohol addiction and in some cases results in death.

Physical Discomfort

Other possible withdrawal symptoms that provide physical discomfort include aches, constipation, diarrhea, fever, headaches, high blood pressure, increased heart rate, memory problems, nausea, panic attacks, seizures, tremors and vomiting. These vary depending on the substance that was being used but an individual will experience a variety of these symptoms.

The main reason why detox can be such a shock to the body is because, when alcohol or drugs were introduced to the brain, it started being flooded by certain chemicals, which caused the brain to produce more countering ones to balance it out. However, once the substance is removed, the brain is still sending all of those countering chemicals in high numbers, and the situation is out of balance again.

Mental Side Effects

The mental side effects of detoxing should not be discounted as experiencing those at home are much more apt to result in an end to the detox and a return to the substance that was being used. The desire to resume regular use is extremely high during this step of the recovery process, and it’s important to be able to push past this point, and assistance is often necessary for this to occur.

Specific withdrawal symptoms related to the mental side of the recovery process include agitation, anxiety, depression, hallucinations, insomnia, lack of interest in things that used to be viewed as important, mood changes, nightmares and oversleeping.

Lack of Support

It’s also of benefit to simply have others around during this trying time as detoxing at home often leaves that person completely alone during one of the most difficult times of their lives. This type of setting, detoxing at home, can exacerbate withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety and depression.

Possible Overdose

It’s important to also point out that those who do relapse while detoxing at home are much more apt to experience an overdose, which can be deadly as the body is often not ready for the dosage that it’s being provided. This is due to the person returning to previous dosage amounts, which may be too much for the body to handle once the detox process has started. The odds of this situation occurring increase the longer the detox period has lasted, but it can still take place during the early stages of the process.

What Can Detox Centers Provide?

One of the most significant benefits of being in a professional environment during this challenging time is simply having medical professional nearby who can help should a dangerous situation develop suddenly and unexpectedly. This immediate medical intervention can and does save lives. For example, should a seizure occur, someone would be there to intervene and help, which would not be possible if detoxing at home.

Another reason why detoxing without the assistance of qualified Arizona detox professionals doesn’t lead to sustained recovery is the failure to address any underlying issues that caused the substance abuse to begin. Addiction is a complex disorder that requires not only a safe detox but also treatment options that will help set the individual up for success.

Desert Cove Recovery has trained medical professionals who are willing to walk you safely through detox. We will work to uncover the underlying issues through therapy sessions and other treatment options.

Probably one of the most important things to consider is that detoxing is not easy. If it was, there would be significantly fewer people addicted to drugs or alcohol, and detox centers would be few and far between. It’s difficult to jump over this significant hurdle of the recovery process, and it becomes so much more difficult and dangerous when attempting to do so on your own.

If you or a loved one is looking to take this important first step on the recovery path, contact Desert Cove Recovery today. We will provide a safe place and medical professionals on hand to ensure that the detox process is done safely and get you started on your road to recovery.

high functioning addiction

Treatment for High Functioning Addiction

Treatment for High Functioning Addiction

Those who are suffering from high functioning addiction are often the most difficult to help. This is partly because they hide their addictions so well, even from themselves in many cases. However, it’s reasonably common as it’s estimated that a fifth of alcoholics have been defined as “functional.”

As the phrase implies, these individuals are high functioning members of society as that relates to their jobs, relationships and otherwise and have continued to be so while in the process of becoming addicted to alcohol or drugs. In other words, they do not present the stereotypical image of someone who is suffering from an addiction. This is often problematic as it results in both the person suffering from the addiction and his or her family, friends and co-workers often denying that an addiction exists when it really does.

In many cases, those with this type of addiction work and experience success in high-profile positions in society and continue to do so while using a considerable amount of alcohol or drugs. Unfortunately, those in these situations are also less apt to get help for it. For example, some may believe that they are too valuable at work to take the time away from it that is necessary to get that help.

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Signs of High Functioning Addiction

One of the toughest things about addiction of this type is that those who care about the person are oftentimes hesitant to say anything when it appears that the addiction is not impacting the person’s life. But it is important to do so as this will, in most cases, only worsen as time passes.

What are some of the signs to look out for?

As far as alcohol goes, simply drinking a considerable amount on a regular basis is cause for concern even if the person appears to not be affected by it as far as family or work goes. For example, a man consuming at least 14 drinks a week or a woman having seven drinks in that time frame are both significant developments that should be disconcerting.

Acting defensive or joking about it when asked about how much is being consumed or hiding it should be noted as well.

Focusing on the substance instead of taking care of themselves in ways such as eating and personal hygiene is another warning sign to consider. Other ones include not socializing as much as had been the case before and accomplishing less at work, doing closer to the minimum expected and not going above and beyond if the latter had been the norm. A decreased interest in hobbies and other activities is another sign.

The Need for Rehab

Many who are in need of rehab do not take advantage of it because of fears of what spending one or more months in rehab might do to their place of employment as well as to themselves in relation to their jobs and reputations. However, if someone is addicted, that person needs to overcome that addiction now, before it worsens. The rehab experience may not be an enjoyable one, but it is one that is very much for the best in the long term.

It should also be considered that, in most cases, family is an especially important element. Oftentimes, someone who is addicted will only consider getting rehab if they realize that sacrificing their substance use is for the good of their family.

Perhaps the biggest warning sign that rehab is necessary occurs when someone defends to himself or herself the need to continue to work by saying that it is necessary in order to continue to receive access to alcohol or drugs. Alcohol/drugs should never be the focus.

If someone you care for is suffering from this, it will likely not be an easy conversation to have, discussing the importance of rehab, but it’s important to stress that need.

How Can Rehab Help?

There are two primary ways that those with a high functioning addiction will be helped by rehab. One is that the addiction is real even if it may not appear so by them or those around them. In other words, the impact on the brain has occurred, and this needs to be reversed for the health of the individual. The other is that somebody who is high functioning while suffering from an addiction today may be non functioning tomorrow. Even if everything appears to be going fine for someone who is high functioning, the possibility of the addiction worsening quickly and significantly is very much there.

If you or somebody you know is suffering from an addiction, whether that’s as a high functioning person or as a low functioning one, please contact Desert Cove Recovery, and we will ensure that help is provided so that short- and long-term recovery can start taking place.

Survey on Opioids in the Workplace Shows Impact on Employers

Survey on Opioids in the Workplace Shows Impact on Employers

Survey on Opioids in the Workplace Shows Impact on EmployersThe results of a survey conducted by The Hartford, a leading property and casualty insurance company, have found the current opioid epidemic is having a “tangible and growing impact” on employers across the US. The survey also found that a majority of Human Resources (HR) professionals and workers feel they don’t have the knowledge or resources necessary to deal with addiction.

Companies of All Sizes Participated in Opioid Survey

Two thousand workers and 500 HR leaders participated in the national survey, which collected responses from companies of all sizes.

• Two-thirds of HR professionals (67 percent) said their company is being impacted by opioid use today or will be in the future.
• Just under two-thirds of the HR professionals (65 percent) revealed that opioid addiction is impacting their company financially.

Employees, HR Staff Feel Unprepared for Substance Use Problems

The Hartford survey is an opportunity for employers to provide addiction education materials to workers, as well as develop and implement consistent policies and procedures regarding drug misuse.

• Many employees (76 percent), as well as HR professionals (64 percent), don’t feel they are well trained when it comes to helping co-workers who have an opioid addiction issue.
• When asked if they could spot the signs of opioid addiction, 24 percent of HR professionals and 18 percent of employees felt extremely or very confident they could.
• Nineteen percent of HR professionals and employees feel they are extremely or very knowledgeable about how to reduce the risk of opioid addiction.

Survey Methodology

The Opioids in the Workplace survey was conducted with an online research panel on August 9-15, 2018. A representative sample of 2,500 US adults from across the nation was divided into two groups. Two thousand full and part-time workers and 500 participants with an HR role answered questions.

The margin of error for the first group is +/-2.2 percent at the 95 percent confidence level. For the second group, the margin of error is +/-4.4 percent at the 95 percent confidence level.

opioid overdoses in az organ transplants

Increases in Opioid Overdoses in Arizona Lead to Spike in Organ Donations

Increases in Opioid Overdoses in Arizona Lead to Spike in Organ Donations

In recent years, drug and opioid overdoses in Arizona have steadily risen. Interestingly enough, so have organ donations. Seeking help from an opioid addiction treatment center today can help lower your risk of becoming another statistic.

So, What is the Connection?

It was once thought that harvesting organs from an individual who suffered from an opioid or drug addiction while they were alive, held too many risks for the patient who would receive said organs. However, researchers have confirmed through recent studies that prove organs from drug-addicted individuals have almost the same transplant success rates as organs from overall healthy individuals.

With the recent spike in opioid-related deaths, there has also been a spike in organ donations, creating a tragic but hopeful realization.  With the increase of overdose deaths, comes the increase of new life opportunities to patients waiting for new organs.

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opioid overdoses in arizona and organ transplants

If There is So Much Hope Found in These Studies, Why is This Seemingly Taboo?

First off, the opioid epidemic is a newer issue facing, not only in Arizona, but The United States as a whole. A recent study done by investigators at the University of Utah Health found that currently 110,000 people across the United States are lingering on organ transplant waiting lists. However, the increase in the opioid epidemic has paved the way for unexpected opportunities in increases of organ availability for donation.

The Annals of Medicine found that a major rise of organ donors who’s death occurred due to an overdose rose up to 13.4% in 2017, compared to the meager 1.1% that it was at in 2000. In Arizona alone, opioid-related deaths have seen a 74 percent increase in the last four years. These numbers suggests that with the rise in organ donations from drug-related overdoses, it could significantly improve our country’s organ shortage. Unfortunately, it also shows that there were a great many organs from opioid overdoses in Arizona that went unused before 2017, which could have saved numerous lives.

While these statistics are encouraging, there is a big question that remains.

Are These Organs Safe to Use For Transplants?

Up until recent years, it was not common practice for medical professionals to accept the use of organs from drug-induced deaths, as there were legitimate concerns for the success of the transplant and the patient who received it.

During an overdose, an individual can experience a drop in blood pressure, which reduces the supply of oxygen and holds the potential to affect the organs negatively. There have also been, and still are, potential risks of infection such as hepatitis C. Although there can be a slightly higher risk of those organs having hepatitis C, at only a 30% risk, it still scares off both medical professionals and patients. Recipients of these donors have shown through testing that patient and graft survival rates remain within the same percentage as those recipients who received organs from trauma or medical deaths.

Dr. Christine Durand from Johns Hopkins Medical School in Baltimore has done numerous studies on this topic and states that; “While it is natural for patients to be concerned when they hear that an organ has an increased risk of infection, the tests for the disease are so effective that the risk is low — for HIV, it is around one in 10 000. For hepatitis C, there is a cure available to treat the recipient if an infection is passed on.”

While these studies were created to better understand the effects these specific types of transplants can have on the receiver, they also stand to offer more insight and knowledge for the patient. Even though having an organ transplant surgery is often necessary to continue having a quality of life, it can still be a daunting thing for any patient to consider. The topic can weigh even heavier when the fear of receiving an organ from a former drug user could mean. The United Network for Organ Sharing policy requires that patients be fully aware of any circumstances of potentially higher risk donations so they can best decide whether or not to accept it.

Opioid Addiction Treatment Can Help Prolong Your Life

While the spike in organ transplants is good news, the method to which they have become so readily available is not. An organ comes with a story unique and all its own. This new organ could hold the potential for a fresh start, a promise for a continued journey, and the hope of a healthy and happy life.

But, even before those organs are given to someone else, the person struggling with addiction has options available to them so that they don’t become another number in these staggering statistics.

If opioid addiction is prevalent in an individual’s life, they have ways to begin moving forward and beginning recovery today. There are numerous opioid addiction treatment centers within Arizona that offer a multitude of treatment options and programs. Don’t let the numbers and addiction dictate the journey. Make the decision for a chance at a new beginning today by calling Desert Cove Recovery.

is ibogaine safe for opioid addiction treatment

Is Ibogaine Safe for Opioid Addiction Treatment?

Is Ibogaine Safe for Opioid Addiction Treatment

Ibogaine treatment has seen a rise in popularity in recent years, specifically when it comes to opioid addiction treatment. There are many claims made regarding the success rates of Ibogaine treatment, which uses a psychoactive compound found in several different plants to facilitate a detox experience for patients addicted to a wide-range of substances. While this treatment seems to show promise, it is important to be aware of the potential risks involved in undergoing this largely unproven and untested form of addiction treatment. Before diving into this treatment method, it’s important to answer the question: is Ibogaine safe?

The Trap of the Magic Pill Mindset

In the battle to overcome addiction, it can be tempting to believe that a simple magic pill or treatment will be the answer to the problem. Unfortunately, addiction is often the result of many factors in one’s life. Whether it be trauma, a genetic predisposition to certain substances, social influences, or other co-occurring disorders, addiction can stem from many root causes, something which a simple treatment modality such as Ibogaine will not fully address.

To quote from Harvard Medical School professor Dr. Bertha Madras: “People think there is going to be a magic pill that’s going to erase addiction, and that’s just not reality. What they should not be desperate for is a quick fix.” While certain treatment methods can be useful in the process of overcoming addiction, a holistic, multi-faceted approach is the recommended way to address an addiction, as it will incorporate each issue which is contributing to the dependence.

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Opioid Addiction Treatment, Is Ibogaine Safe

The Dangers of Ibogaine Treatment

Ibogaine has been promoted recently as an alternative therapy to traditional methods, specifically as an option for opioid addiction treatment. Some medical professionals believe that Ibogaine inhibits the reuptake of serotonin, and that it can not only prevent a person from experiencing dangerous withdrawals, but that it can also reduce a person’s desire to use the substance again.

It is claimed that the spiritual aspects of this substance induce a sense of introspection which also leads to relief from addictive cravings, as a person will have an increased degree of perspective after their Ibogaine experience. This is the result of the fact that Ibogaine is an intense, hallucinogenic drug that can last up to 24 hours. Ibogaine can cause physical responses such as dry mouth, nausea and vomiting, muscle coordination issues, as well as extreme levels of dehydration.

In addition to the physical symptoms a person may experience as a result of taking Ibogaine, the drug can also bring on intense emotional reactions, many of which can be difficult for some individuals to process. If a practitioner is not able to effectively help guide a patient through their experience, Ibogaine can become a terrifying experience, fraught with uncertainty and unclear solutions.

An Uncertain, Unproven Treatment for Addiction

While Ibogaine seems to show promise as a treatment option for addiction, there is simply not enough data to say for sure whether this is a reliable and effective modality. A patient who decides to take the chance and try Ibogaine as a method for curing their addiction must rely on a certain degree of faith, as there is an absence of proven, time-tested evidence to fall back on in terms of how effective this drug is.

Because Ibogaine is listed as a schedule 1 drug in the United States, there are no Ibogaine clinics available stateside where a person can seek treatment. Instead, individuals are forced to go to Mexico and other countries where Ibogaine is allowed, but still not has heavily regulated as it would be in the US. While some clinics may claim to offer a trusted, safe environment for patients to detox within while using Ibogaine, this process is undoubtedly risky and involves a great level of inconvenience for the person who decides to go this route.

In order to answer the question: is Ibogaine safe, we must look at the potential risks inherent in this treatment option. According to a study conducted by the National Institutes of Health, Ibogaine affects the cardiovascular system and there have been alarming reports of life-threatening complications, as well as sudden death cases associated with the administration of Ibogaine. The most likely cause of these sudden death cases was cardiac arrhythmias, showcasing the potential downsides which can impact a patient if they don’t consider all of their current health conditions.

Is Ibogaine Safe? 

Ibogaine is an unknown, mostly untested treatment option which has a long way to go before it can be considered a safe option for patients seeking relief from their drug addiction. The most effective treatment options are always those that address the confluence of factors which can make up the reasons for why a person becomes addicted. Magic pills are an intriguing idea to entertain, but the truth is that they are simply not a realistic outcome for people seeking relief from their addiction.