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recognize opioid overdose

How to Recognize an Opioid Overdose

Recognizing an Overdose Early Can Save a Life

It is a sad but true fact that opiate addiction has been steadily on the rise since the early 2000s. This means that the rates of overdose have also been steadily climbing. In fact, the problem has become so widespread that law enforcement and medical professionals are labeling it an epidemic.

The World Health Organization estimates that at least 69,000 people across the globe die from opiate overdoses each year. To help curb this number, we believe it is important that everyone is educated about this class of drugs as well as the symptoms and how to help someone who may be experiencing an overdose. Continue reading to find out how opioids affect a person, how to recognize an opioid overdose, and what steps to take to help save someone’s life. 

What is an Opioid?

Opioids are a category of painkillers that include well-known drugs such as heroin, morphine, OxyContin, Vicodin, methadone and tramadol. Due to the nature of these drugs, it is easy to become dependent on them if a person is not under careful medical supervision.

Most often, these types of drugs are given to people who have serious surgeries, significant injuries or chronic pain, but substances like heroin are most often introduced on the streets, sometimes when a person is unable to get more of their prescribed opioids.

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recognize opioid overdhose

How Do Opioids Affect a Person?

Opiates bind to certain receptors in the brain that help to block pain signals and make the user feel relaxed. When used in a managed setting, they are excellent tools for people who suffer from intense pain.

Issues arise when people take too much at once or begin to use the drugs as a way to escape from real life.

How to Recognize an Opioid Overdose

There are several telltale signs that a person is experiencing an opioid overdose.

Physical signs include:

  • Slowed breathing
  • Bluish tint around fingernails or lips
  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Vomiting or painful constipation
  • Inability to be woken from sleep
  • Slow or irregular heartbeat
  • Cold or clammy skin
  • Unusual paleness
  • Extreme mood swings
  • Confusion or drunken behavior

If you encounter someone with these symptoms, it is critical to contact emergency medical services right away because the person’s life is in immediate danger. Opiate overdoses can kill a person quickly, so every moment counts.

How to Help Someone Who Has Overdosed

Though you should immediately call 911 when you recognize an overdose, there are steps you can take to assist the person until help arrives.

If the person is unconscious, roll him or her to one side. This helps prevent people from choking if they vomit while unconscious. If the person is still conscious, do your best to keep the person talking to you and don’t let him or her fall asleep. Because these drugs slow breathing functions, allowing an overdosed person to fall asleep can lead to cessation of breathing.

Don’t leave the person alone if you can help it. A conscious person will be delirious and can easily get into a dangerous situation, and an unconscious person may stop breathing. If left unattended, you won’t be able to administer rescue breathing if necessary.

There is also a treatment for these overdoses called naloxone. This is something that emergency rooms have used for many years to help reverse these types of overdoses, especially heroin-related ones. Due to the dramatic increase in overdose deaths, however, it is now common for emergency medical personnel and even caregivers to carry naloxone with them.

Naloxone comes in nasal spray and injectable forms and can give the overdosed person up to an hour’s respite from overdose symptoms. This does not stop the overdose permanently, so it is still important to call emergency responders to give the person lifesaving medical treatment. In addition, following an overdose, the person will likely require some sort of opioid addiction treatment to ensure that they don’t use heroin or other opioids again once they have recovered from the overdose.

Encountering an opioid overdose can be a frightening experience, but learning how to recognize the signs and give assistance can save lives.

Prescription Drug Addiction Rising Among Older Americans

One section of the population that is often overlooked when it comes to the prescription drug abuse epidemic is the group of older Americans. There are several contributing factors that have made them more susceptible to this, and it is often harder to detect among the elderly.

rxdrugsA recent article draws into light the concerns among healthcare professionals in North Dakota about prescription drug addiction among older people in the United States.

Although most of the focus on prescription drug abuse has been on teenagers and younger adults, the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) states that the number of people 55 and older admitted to the emergency room due to nonmedical use of prescription drugs more than tripled between 2004 and 2011.

Additionally, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reports that close to 30 percent of people between ages 57 to 85 use at least five prescriptions. While some of these prescriptions may be life-saving medications, there are often drugs such as painkillers or anti-anxiety pills mixed in. There is also an increased risk of danger when multiple drugs are mixed together, as these drug interactions can create a new level of toxicity and a plethora of potential side effects.

Some signs to watch out for may include memory loss or confusion, which can be separated out from early forms of Alzheimer’s by a primary care physician conducting tests. Other signs include being overly concerned about the amount of medications, when they’re taken and whether or not they’re going to run out.

Due to the possibility of multiple health conditions and medications, not all treatment facilities are equipped to deal with older adults. The detoxification procedures can be more complex and take specialist doctors who are familiar with the situation.

If you know of someone who may need help with prescription drug abuse, contact us today for a free consultation.