Tag Archives: alcohol dependence

detoxing from alcohol dangers

Alcohol Rehabilitation Arizona Takes Look at the Dangers of Detoxing from Alcohol

Alcohol Rehabilitation Arizona Takes Look at the Symptoms and Dangers of Detoxing from Alcohol 

Detoxing from alcohol can cause a variety of symptoms in the person who is experiencing withdrawal. People who consume alcohol often develop a dependency that is both physical and psychological. Even when the user understands the physical aspect of this substance, the psychological effects of withdrawal will often come as a surprise. Consider the value of using the services offered at an alcohol rehabilitation Arizona facility. You can always call the help desk for assistance when you need access to reliable information about alcohol withdrawal. This is a great way to learn about the services offered at Desert Cove Recovery. This will also allow you to get the answers to any questions you might have about how the rehabilitation process works.

Disorientation and Confusion

Withdrawing from alcohol can cause temporary disorientation or confusion. It can be difficult to think clearly or make decisions. However, getting access to reliable information is very important. The first step to recovery is learning about the problem, and it can take some time to sort through the information. This is a necessary part of the process of rehabilitation, which is why there are places to go for help. For example, people who are interested in getting professional help for their drinking problem can find resources at a facility for alcohol rehabilitation Arizona. This is an important option to consider because of the physical and mental effects that can take place when you are detoxing from alcohol. Some addicts try to detoxify alone, but this can be dangerous in many cases. The effect that the symptoms can have on family members, friends or co-workers should also be considered.

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dangers of detoxing from alcohol

Detoxing from Alcohol, Common Problems

There are a variety of symptoms that can accompany the withdrawal of alcohol. These may include night sweats, insomnia, headaches, tremors, nausea, appetite problems and mood swings. There are many other symptoms that can occur as well, so you should understand that there are many ways that the withdrawals can manifest in the human body. The individual differences between one person and another can also make it difficult to tell if a particular problem is happening because of the withdrawal from alcohol. This is an excellent example of how the professional services that are available at an alcohol rehabilitation center can help. In addition to providing the psychological support necessary to get through the withdrawals, these centers also provide access to resources, networks and other social services. This can help a person to learn how to live without drinking, which can be difficult for many alcoholics.

The symptoms of alcohol withdrawal may vary a lot from one individual to another. There are many differences between people who consume alcohol, and the degree of dependency may also be affected by things like the person’s body weight, muscle mass and any other medical conditions that exist. In addition, the psychological effects of withdrawal are also related to the individual history. This may include domestic violence, childhood traumas and other serious events. Substance abuse is often used to mask pain, and the symptoms can be much worse for people who have untreated traumas that are driving the addiction. If you begin to experience symptoms during the first day after you quit drinking alcohol, then that is a sign that you could need professional help. Making the transition into sobriety is difficult for anyone, but this can be a critical period for certain people.

Severity of Symptoms

Severe cases may require additional intervention, and the rehabilitation process would start later in these cases. For example, some people will experience auditory or visual hallucinations within the first 24 hours after quitting. Existing medical conditions might also be aggravated during this period, which can be dangerous for people who already have heart conditions or high blood pressure. In addition, there is often a good amount of mental disorientation that can occur when you are in the withdrawal period. This can make it difficult to communicate effectively with other people, make good decisions or handle your daily responsibilities. Excessive emotions often accompany the withdrawal period, and this can become dangerous. In serious cases, domestic violence is likely to happen unless there is some kind of intervention.

Alcohol Rehabilitation Arizona

Learn how to get the help that you need in order to deal with the effects of withdrawing from alcohol. There are people who are trained and ready to help you recover from this difficult problem. Protect your family and friends by relying on the services provided by trained and experienced professionals. Dependency on this substance can create symptoms that are uncomfortable, and family members or friends might not be able to understand what is happening. If you are concerned about your safety, and the well-being of the other people in your life, consider using the services provided at a facility for alcohol rehabilitation Arizona at Desert Cove Recovery.

Perks of Giving up Alcohol for Good: Sobriety Perks

Perks of Giving up Alcohol for Good: Sobriety Perks

While the thought of giving up alcohol might seem overwhelming to some people, doing so can offer numerous long-term benefits. Some sobriety perks include such things as better sleep, better skin and hair, and a reduction of risk for such conditions as diabetes, cancer, liver disease and others. You may also enjoy better relationships with your friends and family. If you are thinking about giving up alcohol, it may be easier when you think about the sobriety perks that you will enjoy instead of focusing on not being able to drink.

Sleep More Without Alcohol

Drinking alcohol disrupts your sleep. In one study that was published in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, a peer-reviewed journal, the researchers found that people who drink alcohol before they go to sleep show an increase in alpha waves. Alpha waves are most common when people are awake but in a resting state. This means that your sleep is disrupted. A meta-analysis of 27 studies of alcohol’s effect on sleep found that while alcohol might help people to fall asleep faster initially, it causes them to toss and turn at night and interferes with their REM sleep. This results in fatigue, lower concentration and problems with focusing during the day. When you give up alcohol, you can look forward to better sleep, less fatigue and a better ability to concentrate during the day.

Without Alcohol Your Hair and Skin will Shine

Since alcohol is a diuretic, it can cause you to become dehydrated easily. This may also cause your skin to become less hydrated, leading to complexion problems. When you give up alcohol, you’ll notice that your skin looks fuller and less dry. Ruddiness around your nose and on your cheeks may also fade, and other skin issues may improve. your hair is also likely to improve. It may become shinier and fuller when you give up alcohol for good.

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perks of giving up alcohol

Lessen the Risk of Disease When You Give up Drinking

A huge benefit of giving up alcohol is that you can enjoy substantially lower risks of developing certain diseases. The National Cancer Institute reports that quitting drinking can reduce your risk of developing seven different types of cancer. In a study that was reported in the National Institutes of Health’s Report on Carcinogens, 19,500 cancer deaths in 2009 were alcohol-related, which accounted for 3.5 percent of the total.

In addition to reducing your risk of cancer, quitting alcohol can also help to reduce your risk of diabetes and liver disease. Your liver is responsible for processing liver. When people drink too much alcohol, the liver is unable to keep up and stores glucose as fat. If you have a fatty liver, stopping drinking may allow it to heal so that you can lower your risk of developing liver disease or cirrhosis. Moderate amounts of alcohol may cause your blood sugar to rise while excessive amounts of alcohol may cause it to fall dangerously. This may raise your risk of developing diabetes. Quitting drinking can help you to get your blood sugar under control.

Relationships Improve Without Alcohol

There is no question that alcohol can negatively impact relationships with your family and friends. When you quit drinking, you can concentrate on rebuilding these relationships. Remaining sober may help you to learn how to deal with disappointments and stress in a healthier way.

Lose Weight When You Give Up Alcohol

A great benefit of quitting drinking is that you may find that you lose excess weight almost effortlessly. There are quite a few calories in alcohol. When you stop drinking, you give up those excess calories. As long as you don’t replace the calories with desserts or snacks, you may begin to lose the excess weight that you have wanted to for a long time.

More Money When You’re Not Buying Alcohol

Drinking costs a lot of money, especially if you have been a moderate or heavy drinker or have indulged in expensive liqueurs or wines. Sitting down with a calculator and a pen and paper can be eye-opening. Tally up how much you drank each day both at home and while you were out and look at the cost. It can be very motivating for most people to remain sober when they see exactly how much their former alcohol use cost them each month. A fun thing to do is to put the money that you used to spend on alcohol in your savings and reward yourself for your sobriety with a fun trip.

Embracing sobriety for the long term may seem like a daunting idea, but you may enjoy numerous benefits when you do. Keep reminding yourself of these sobriety perks, and make certain to talk to people in your support network when you experience cravings. Soon, you will be on your way to a healthier and happier life that is alcohol-free.

Sources
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.12621/abstract

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/alcohol/alcohol-fact-sheet#q2

http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/twelfth/profiles/AlcoholicBeverageConsumption.pdf

https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/drinking-alcohol

sober dorms

Sober Dorms Provide Support for College Students in Recovery

The college years are a time when young people are exploring and finding out who they are, in addition to furthering their education. For many of them, this process includes spending time partying with friends and making decisions about drinking and using drugs.

The results of a 2016 report compiled by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA) found that 1.2 million full-time college students consume alcohol. The same report also revealed that more than 700,000 students smoke marijuana on a typical day.

Binge Drinking Common on College Campuses

Binge drinking (defined as consuming five or more drinks in two hours for men and more drinks in two hours for women) is a common occurrence on college campuses, according to figures released by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

Students who arrive on campus can expect that there will be a certain level of drinking and drug use going on. For young people with a history of substance abuse or addiction, this level of exposure may not be helpful for them.

Significant Percentage of College Students Have History of Substance Abuse

According to Lisa Laitman, the director of Alcohol & Other Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) at Rutgers University, up to 30 percent of college students have a history of substance use disorders. Research has also shown that substance abuse rates are higher for college students than for peers of the same age who are not enrolled in classes.

More Collegiate Recovery Programs Now Include Sober Dorms

Colleges are responding by offering “collegiate recovery programs” (CRPs) to provide help to students stay sober and stay enrolled in school. These programs include:

Mental health counseling
• Substance abuse counseling
• Peer-to-peer support
• Recovery support group meetings
• Sober social activities and programs

A number of programs include sober dorms where no drugs or alcohol are permitted. These are environments where students support each other’s sobriety.

Transforming Youth Recovery, a non-profit organization, says the number of CRPs has grown from 35 to over 150 over the past five years. Approximately 50 have sober living residences for students.

In the wake of the biggest overdose epidemic in American history, it would be great to see every college and university campus to start creating sober dorms in recognition and support for the students who need ongoing help.

CDC Tallies Alcohol Poisoning Deaths in the U.S.

cdcvsalcapdAccording to U.S. federal health authorities, an average of six Americans die from alcohol poisoning each day. Middle-aged, white males have the highest mortality rates.

The CDC found that an average of 2,221 people died of alcohol poisoning annually between 2010 and 2012. Three-quarters of the deaths occurred among 35- to 64-year-olds, the report found, and about three-quarters were men. Men aged 45 to 54 had the highest death rate.

This is the first study in a decade to tally alcohol poisonings for the entire American population. Most previous studies reviewed certain groups, specifically young people.

“Most previous studies have looked at college kids and young people, but the problem is bigger than that,” said Dr. Robert Brewer, who heads the alcohol program at the C.D.C. “It was surprising that the number of deaths was so concentrated among middle-age adults.”

Native Americans and Native Alaskans had the highest rate of deaths from alcohol poisoning, with 49 deaths per one million people. This is far above the approximately nine deaths per one million people that is the average for the country. The bulk of deaths, 67 percent, were among non-Hispanic whites.

The lowest death rate was in Alabama, followed by Texas, Illinois and Virginia. States with the highest death rates were mostly in the Great Plains and the West, but also included two states in New England, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

Blood-alcohol levels rise sharply when large amounts of alcohol are consumed in a short period of time. Sharply rising blood-alcohol levels overwhelm the body’s ability to respond. Excessive alcohol intake can shut down parts of the brain that control breathing, body temperature and heart rate, causing death.

Such deaths are typically the result of binge drinking at high intensity, the report said. About 38 million adults report binge drinking an average of four times a month, according to the report, but the vast majority of binge drinkers — about 90 percent — are not alcoholics.

Binge drinking is defined as four or more drinks in one “occasion” for women, and five or more drinks for men. Alcohol dependence was a contributing cause in just one-third of the deaths, the report found.