DEA Reminds Us Not to Forget About Meth

methamphetamineHeroin and prescription drugs are certainly the hot topics when it comes to drug abuse in recent years, but recent comments from representatives of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) carry a warning that methamphetamine use is on the rise again in many areas. In fact, not only is it coming over the Southwest border still, but it is reaching the outer limits of the country in rapid fashion.

Methamphetamine is a man-made drug that gives the user an intense high and feeling of euphoria. The drug is comprised of chemicals that can be found in various household items like lye, battery acid, fertilizer, rubbing alcohol, brake cleaner and other hazardous chemicals. When ingested, users initially feel a rush of euphoria, followed by an intense burst of energy that usually ends in hallucinations and paranoia. The drug is so addictive that users will go to great lengths to obtain the drug and remain high.

Methamphetamine is not new to the country of course, but the production process has changed throughout the years. In the past, it was most common for small groups to manufacture the drug and distribute it throughout their area. Sometimes addicts would make their own supply, using easy to find ingredients. In more recent years, however, the production has shifted to superlabs south of the border. Drug cartels in Mexico are now supplying methamphetamine in huge quantities right along with the heroin that has become so pervasive.

In fact, many heroin users report that meth is their next drug of choice. “Methamphetamine is a dark horse riding side by side with heroin,” said DEA Acting Special Agent in Charge Doug James.

So, while drug prevention efforts need to remain on heroin and prescription drugs, it is important that methamphetamine stay on the forefront as well. The insidious way that methamphetamine has of consuming a person is amplified if prevention efforts don’t remain focused there as well.

About Blake Nichols

Blake Nichols is the Director of Operations at Desert Cove Recovery. Blake battled his own addiction to drugs and alcohol and was given the gift of recovery at the age of 23. Since 2008, Blake has dedicated his life and career to the field of addiction. He has experience in all aspects of addiction treatment including direct care, admissions, marketing, and administration.
Blake feels that the greatest reward of working in the recovery field is being part of the transformation that a person goes through from the time they arrive and begin treatment, through the hard work and the Miracle of recovery, and ultimately the change into a confident and capable person ready to carry the message of recovery.
"My career has focused on serving others. I have accepted ownership of my responsibilities as that is the key to working at the highest level of professionalism. I have worked to be positive and offer solution-based suggestions in my work and personal life."