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Alcohol Rehab Arizona Looks at the Effects of Binge-Drinking in College and Beyond

Alcohol Rehab Arizona Looks at the Effects of Binge-Drinking in College and Beyond

Alcohol Rehab Arizona Looks at the Effects of Binge-Drinking in College and Beyond

Many college students enter collegiate life with a great deal of drinking experience behind them. For others, being in college is marked by a time of experimentation amid newfound freedoms. The effects of binge-drinking in college and beyond can range from personal physical injuries to a lifelong battle with alcoholism. When binge-drinking leads to regular, heavy consumption of alcohol, the result is often an addiction that requires a qualified alcohol rehab Arizona.

Binge-drinking is defined by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), as consuming excessive amounts of alcohol during two hours to the point of raising the blood alcohol concentration to a level of 0.08 or more. It typically takes men five drinks or more in two hours to reach this level, and just four drinks or more for women.

Desert Cove Recovery understands the difficult journey addicted individuals undertake and offers a wide range of effective treatment programs.

Alcohol is Cheap and Accessible for College Students

After graduating from high school, going to college can be the first time many young people are left to make their own decisions without their parents around. They are more likely than those who do not attend college to have binge-drinking experiences and engage in other risk-taking behaviors.

Alcohol is relatively cheap and easily accessible by anyone above the legal age to purchase and consume it. Some colleges foster an environment that encourages drinking. Recent societal trends have led to more awareness of the dangers and effects of binge-drinking. Fraternities and sororities have historically been part of a drinking culture that encouraged members to drink to excess.

Binge-drinking can lead to a wide range of short- and long-term consequences that can have severe negative impacts on the person who is drinking and their loved ones. When binge-drinking gets out of control, alcohol addiction can take hold. Desert Cove Recovery offers effective treatment programs for alcohol rehab, Arizona residents. The therapies and support provided there can help with the effects of binge-drinking in college and beyond.

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Effects of Binge-Drinking in College and Beyond, alcohol rehab arizona

Short-Term Effects of Binge-Drinking

Users feel the effects of alcohol within just 5-10 minutes of consumption. An average-sized person’s liver can break down about one drink an hour. When more alcohol is consumed than the liver can process, the blood alcohol content increases. Alcohol also has adverse effects on cognition and motor reflexes.

Other binge-drinking factors include how quickly the alcohol is consumed, how recently the person has eaten, and the individual’s body type. Age, sex, and ethnicity can also play a role in how the body processes and reacts to drinking alcohol.

In the most severe cases, binge-drinking can result in alcohol poisoning, which can kill someone after one binge-drinking session. Additionally, if someone has passed out from drinking, depressing their gag reflex can lead to them choking on their vomit and dying.

Binge-drinking alcohol negatively impacts reaction times and inhibits judgment capacities. Excessive alcohol consumption also increases the risks of personal injuries and deaths from car accidents, drowning, suffocation, or many other types of accidents.

Long-Term Effects of Binge-Drinking

Research has not yet determined how long the physical effects binge-drinking can have on the body or if it is possible to recover from damage caused by excessive alcohol entirely. A study from the University of California at San Francisco discovered that someone partaking in 21 binge-drinking sessions in less than two months might begin to see symptoms of early-stage liver cancer.

Researchers continue to uncover more data on the long-term effects of binge-drinking. As for now, we know that heavy alcohol use over time can lead to varying health conditions. These health conditions may affect:

  • Blood and immune system
  • Bones and muscles
  • Brain and nervous system
  • Intestines
  • Mental health
  • Sexual health

Alcohol Rehab Arizona

Help is available to control the effects of binge-drinking in college and beyond. If you or a loved one is dealing with issues involving the effects of binge-drinking, Desert Cove Recovery offers treatment programs at alcohol rehab, Arizona. A team of compassionate staff can provide the tools necessary to overcome alcohol addiction.

Getting Your Life Back with Desert Cove Recovery

Desert Cove Recovery offers holistic detox and addiction treatment for those suffering from substance abuse. We tailor our treatment plans to the unique needs of each individual. The length of time it takes to complete a recovery program depends wholly on the patient. We understand that each person’s experience with addiction is different. Additionally, Desert Cove Recovery accepts most insurance plans, making alcohol rehab in Arizona more accessible.

Take back your life – contact a member of the Desert Cove Recovery team today, and begin your road to recovery!

 

 

 

alcohol's impact on sleep

Alcohol’s Impact On Sleep

Alcohol’s Impact On Sleep

It’s a common occurrence; you have a hard time falling asleep and think a small drink before bed will help calm you down and help you fall asleep. You’re not wrong; having an alcoholic drink or two may likely induce sleep more quickly, as it’s sedative properties take your body over. But you may not know about alcohol’s impact on sleep once you’ve drifted off, and how harmful the overall impact can be.

Alcohol’s sedative effect doesn’t last for long as our bodies quickly build a tolerance for the sedation of alcohol and we find ourselves needing to consume more alcohol for the same ‘get-to-sleep,’ effects. Before you know it, you’re relying all too heavily on alcohol to get you to sleep, and that’s just the start of problems for your brain and body.

Not only are you relying on the sedative effects of alcohol to put you to sleep (or too often, help you pass out), you are damaging the quality of your sleep as well. Research has shown that even small amounts of alcohol in our systems as we go to sleep have a tremendous impact on our sleep cycles and restorative sleep properties, and our entire night’s sleep is affected. Alcohol’s impact on sleep is multi-faceted and affects our bodies and our brains.

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alcohol use disorder's impact on sleep

How Does Alcohol Impact Our Sleep Rhythms?

When we drink alcohol before bed, even a glass, research shows that our brains have more slow-wave sleep patterns. This Delta activity is important for sleeping deeply and soundly while your brain is imprinting memories and committing learned things for later access. That sounds great in theory, but the problem is that alcohol before bed also brings with it Alpha activity.

Alpha activity doesn’t typically happen during sleep as much as when you’re resting but acting together, the alpha and delta activity can hinder your sleep and the restorative properties your brain gets from sleep. The alpha wave intrusion has also been linked with fatigue, sleep disorders and major depressive disorders. In essence, alcohol before sleeping can mimic those degenerative conditions.

Our bodies also work on sleep and circadian rhythms. You might have heard the term and thought it nothing more than a pattern your body goes through daily, and at the core, that’s accurate. That said, circadian rhythms are physical and mental changes and they primarily respond to darkness and light. This is why we tend to sleep at night and be awake during day hours.

How Do Circadian Rhythm Disruptions Affect Our Health?

Experts believe that alcohol before bed affects the production of chemicals in our body that triggers our circadian rhythms to do their jobs. Yes, the production of sleep-inducing adenosine helps us fall asleep more quickly, but it doesn’t last long, and we tend to wake up more in the middle of the night. This means that we aren’t getting fully restorative sleep, and over time, this has a major impact on our brain and body functions.

It’s important that we maintain our body’s natural circadian rhythms as best we can. When we don’t, we can affect everything from our liver to our gut flora and microbiome. Our gut and microbiome are what many call the body’s second brain. When we affect our body’s circadian rhythms with alcohol consumption, we are also affecting our gut and could even lead to developing leaky gut syndrome. Our bodies and our brains depend on restorative sleep for overall health and wellness.

What Is Restorative Sleep and Why Is It So Important?

Perhaps you’ve heard of REM (Rapid-Eye Movement) Sleep and know it to be important to a good night’s rest. But do you know how important REM sleep is? It’s the truly way sleep ‘feeds’ one’s brain at night and is considered the most restorative type of sleep.

When one is in REM sleep, their brain activity is rapidly increased and restoring the taxation of the day’s events on the brain so that you can get up refreshed and ready to tackle the next day with vim and vigor. The problem with alcohol before bed, though, and particularly increasing amounts to help one fall asleep, is that alcohol blocks REM sleep.

And while at the surface, that feeling of grogginess and exhaustion the next day can leave one feeling miserable, repeated interruption of REM sleep can have other physiological effects too. When we sleep uninterruptedly, our brains take the opportunity to remove the neurotoxins we’ve encountered through the day. Interrupted sleep that brings about less REM sleep means our brains can’t efficiently clean those toxins out, and this can set them up for higher risks of diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Excessive Alcohol Consumption Destroys Sleep Patterns

No, a glass of wine or a beer here or there before bed will not be a deal-breaker for good sleep habits for the rest of your life. But as is often the case with consuming alcohol for sleep induction or other physiological or psychological pain, our bodies need more and more alcohol to bring about the same effects. Initially, a glass of wine or a beer will be all we need to ‘put us to sleep.’ But over time, our tolerance will build and we’ll find ourselves struggling to get to sleep with the same amount. Before we know it, addiction sets in.

Sleep deprivation itself is a form of torture because we know how not getting restorative sleep can affect our entire lives. When alcohol use disorder is thrown into the mix, it’s a vicious cycle of can’t-win, exacerbated by conditions like sleepwalking, obstructive sleep apnea, exhaustion and insomnia. Sadly, sleep deprivation can make alcohol recovery even more difficult and daunting.

This is where the caring and compassionate staff at Desert Cove Recovery comes in.

Recovering Your Sleep and Your Life

While alcohol’s impact on sleep is tremendously multi-faceted, the staff at Desert Cove Recovery knows that alcohol’s impact on your life is even greater. And, because they know sleep disturbances can hinder addiction recovery, they work with you through the process of recovery in a caring and individualized way that takes all of your concerns into account.

One of the most difficult things one has to do to begin recovery is to admit that addiction exists. When you’ve not been getting restorative sleep, you see things at a different angle, and this admittance can be even more grueling.

Desert Cove Recovery understands this and wants to help you recover not only a good night’s sleep, but your best life—the one you were meant to live before alcohol became dominant in your life. The rehab programs at Desert Cove were designed to help clients overcome addiction and lead happy and healthy lives, and this includes helping you learn to get through things in this life without relying on alcohol to do so.

There is hope for better sleep, better health and happiness without alcohol and you just need to take the first steps of contact with Desert Cove Recovery to start that path. Make the call; you deserve it.

is alcohol a drug

Is Alcohol a Drug?

Is Alcohol a Drug?

Many people often ask the question: is alcohol a drug? Because this substance is seen as a socially acceptable form of recreation and is widely available throughout the vast majority of the United States, it can be easy to believe drinking is not akin to using drugs. But this lack of stigma or taboo status doesn’t take away from the fact that alcohol is still the third leading preventable cause of death in the country. Society’s relaxed views on the substance can contribute to a casual, almost indifferent attitude towards alcohol abuse. Because casual drinking is tolerated in society and isn’t frowned upon, it can be difficult to accept that drinking is more than just a harmless form of recreation and can have serious health consequences if one doesn’t moderate their usage.

What is a Drug?

In order to determine whether alcohol can be considered a drug, it’s important to define what a drug is. According to Merriam-Webster, a drug is defined as a substance that has a physiological effect on a person when ingested or introduced to the body. Under this broad definition, it can be easy to answer the question: is alcohol a drug? This is due to the fact that the ingestion of this substance has a direct impact on how a person’s body functions.

While much has been made of the recent opioid crisis, what is often lost in the mix is the fact that alcohol use and abuse constitutes a serious health emergency in the United States.
According to the Centers for Disease Control, an estimated 88,000 people each year die from alcohol-related causes, highlighting the severity of the problem. In fact, according to a 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, approximately 6.2% of adults in the US have an alcohol use disorder, an example of how common this drug is impacting the general population.

Alcohol abuse disorder and substance abuse disorder can be used interchangeably when discussing drinking or drug use, showcasing how similar these two conditions can be. Regardless of whether a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, both substances can cause a person to lose sight of their priorities, creating a strain on their health and relationships with others. In both situations, a person will often ignore their most important responsibilities in favor of drinking or using another drug. Alcohol can be similarly self-destructive to that of using drugs, as it can create a distorted relationship with one’s self and the world they inhabit.

How Excessive Drinking Can Wreck a Person’s Health and Social Life

Alcohol consumption can have profound health implications for a person if they begin to regularly use this substance to excess. Side effects of consuming alcohol include damage to one’s heart, as heavy drinking can weaken the heart and negatively affect how oxygen and nutrients are delivered to your body’s vital organs. This can eventually lead to things such as high blood pressure and an irregular heartbeat. An individual’s overall health can be severely impacted by regular alcohol consumption, and other organs such as the liver, brain, kidneys, pancreas, and other areas of one’s body can also be affected.

In addition to clear-cut physical symptoms, there are also cognitive and mental health conditions that can manifest themselves when a person is using alcohol regularly to excess. Things such as lapses in memory and coordination, nerve damage, and mood dysregulation can all be the result of alcohol consumption. A person’s overall sense of self-esteem can be depleted through an alcohol abuse disorder, which can also exacerbate existing mental health conditions. An increase in things such as anxiety can also develop as the result of a person’s drinking.

Outside of the physical effects to one’s body, an addiction to alcohol can also result in serious negative consequences to one’s social life. Once a person begins to prioritize their substance abuse above the people most important in their life, their relationships will begin to suffer. Eventually, a person may feel as though the only people they can comfortably associate with are those who share a person’s level of substance abuse.

Addressing the Problem Proactively

If alcohol is your drug of choice and you find yourself struggling to maintain control, it’s critical to take the initiative to regain control of your direction in life. Often, this can require seeking professional outside help in order to facilitate and speed up one’s path to recovery. Treatment for alcohol use disorder can include a number of serious health interventions that can require medical supervision in certain cases where a physical detox is required. It can also involve a psychotherapeutic component as a way to not only quit alcohol but determine why the habit formed to begin with.

Attempting to overcome an addiction to drugs or alcohol can feel like an uphill battle, especially if you’re going it alone without any outside support. If you’re seeking support to make this important self-transformation a reality and are looking for an excellent addiction treatment center, contact Desert Cove Recovery today. Our trusted team will help guide you through the rehab process, working side-by-side with you to create a treatment plan that works and have you on the path to a new lease on life.

quit drinking for good

You Can Quit Drinking for Good

You Can Quit Drinking for Good

Many alcoholics may have trouble admitting they have a drinking problem because alcohol is socially accepted as opposed to other drugs that lead to addiction. But, statistics show that one in eight Americans is an alcoholic. That amounts to more than 12 percent of the U.S. population. Knowing that excessive drinking is a problem many people face can help someone get the help they need to quit drinking for good. Admitting there is a problem is the first step; one that can be the most difficult to face.

Why It Can Be Difficult to Quit Drinking for Good

Once you admit you have a drinking problem, the next step is to seek help. If you think you can do this alone, you may want to reconsider. Many people try it on their own and run into one or more of these issues that prevent them from quitting drinking.

Long-term alcohol use affects brain chemistry

When you decide you want to stop drinking, it’s not as easy as just making a conscious decision. When you use alcohol for a long period of time, your brain chemistry changes leaving you feeling as though you need alcohol to function. Professionals know how to safely handle withdrawal symptoms as you detox from alcohol.

You may experience severe withdrawal symptoms

When people try to quit drinking on their own, they may experience withdrawal symptoms they can’t handle on their own. These can include nausea, vomiting, trembling, anxiety, and much more. At an alcohol rehab program, professionals can determine how to help you detox from alcohol and deal with withdrawal symptoms in a safe way so that you’re not tempted to drink again.
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Alcohol is socially accepted

Unlike drugs, which are illegal, alcohol is legal and socially accepted. If you’re out with friends or at a party, you may be offered a drink or two by people who don’t realize you have an addiction. While they may be able to stop at that point, it’s different for you. If you are trying to quit on your own and are offered alcohol while you’re out, quitting can become increasingly difficult.

How Rehab Can Help for Long-Term Recovery

If you have realized you have an alcohol problem and are ready to seek the help you need to live a sober life, extended care rehab can help. Many people have the misconception that alcohol rehab programs solely consist of AA meetings. While meetings can be part of the recovery process, they are not the entire process. Since everyone’s addiction is treated differently, so is everyone’s recovery.

When you seek help, you will first be evaluated to see if detox is necessary. No other therapy can begin until your body is free from the substance you’ve become addicted to. Professionals at the rehab facility will assure that your detox is medically monitored and that any withdrawal symptoms are dealt with safely by a medical team.

From that point, the course of your treatment will be determined. Some people do well in shortened programs, depending on their level of addiction, while others need more time to sort through their issues and start living a sober life. Whichever category you fall into is perfectly fine. The important thing is that you are now seeking the help you need. Everything else will begin to fall into place as long as you are following the steps of your program and putting in the work that is necessary to succeed.

In order to help you recover, you will likely go through therapy sessions to help you determine what led to your addiction. This is an important part of the recovery process because you need to learn what triggers to avoid, or how to deal with those triggers should you not be able to completely avoid them, in order to get well.

Often times hearing other people’s stories through group sessions can help people recover because they realize they are truly not alone. Knowing that there are other people who are going through the same thing at the same time can be comforting. It can also help to build new friendships and bonds with people who have the same goals.

How Extended Care Rehab Can Help

For some people, short term programs are enough, but for others, extended care rehab is needed. This will be determined by your clinician. The benefits of extended care rehab are that you can work on physical and body issues to help with your recovery. These areas may not be entirely addressed during a regular rehab stay.

At Desert Cove Recovery extended care recovery programs are available to those who need it. During this program, you can expect individual therapy sessions where a therapist will address your issues one-on-one. There are also group therapy sessions available as well as a relapse prevention program that will focus specifically on how to maintain your sobriety.

The final part of the process relies on the transition process to help you succeed out in the world once you leave the program. Once you do leave, you may still attend meetings from time to time on an outpatient basis.

If you’re ready to start your path to recovery, contact Desert Cove Recovery today. One of our caring staff members will answer your call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can also fill out an online form to get in contact with our team. They will help you to begin living a sober life.

Substance Abuse vs Addiction

Substance Abuse vs Addiction

Substance Abuse vs Addiction

All too often, the phrase “substance abuse” is used interchangeably with the word “addiction.” Abuse and addiction take similar physical, psychological, and social tolls for those who are suffering. However, it is important to understand the difference between substance abuse vs addiction. Learning about each will help you identify if an individual is casually abusing drugs or alcohol or in serious need of assistance to break an addiction.

Recognizing Substance Abuse

Substance abuse and addiction are not actually the same thing. On the surface, substance abuse may not look like extreme or dangerous behavior. In fact, it may not stand out as abnormal at all. If drinking or recreational drug use has become normalized in your social circle, you could even be abusing substances without knowing it. 

Substance abuse involves using a substance, whether it be alcohol, prescription drugs, or illicit “street” drugs, to a point that becomes a hazard to your health. This includes using medications in ways other than prescribed.

When Substance Use Starts to Affect Your LIfe

Substance abuse also includes using substances to a point where doing so starts to affect your ability to live your life as you had prior to using. This point can come far quicker than many people realize. As soon as you start using your substance of choice to cope with emotions, thoughts, stress, or living situations, you are abusing that particular substance. This is true even if you have not experienced any consequences yet as a result. 

For example, consider alcohol consumption. According to the USDA, a safe and moderate level of alcohol consumption is no more than one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men. Someone who drinks more than this is abusing alcohol by definitions, even if their consumption does not appear excessive to others. It has been shown drinking past the recommended daily limit increases the risk alcohol will affect your health, put at risk for DUIs, and other undesirable outcomes. 

Most individuals who abuse substances but are not yet addicted, feel like they can stop whenever they want to. Some people abuse substances intermittently instead of regularly. This can mask the fact that there is a problem. Substance abuse is still a widespread issue causing problems in many people’s lives. The CDC notes that more than 10 percent of people over the age of 12 have used some type of illicit drug in the past month. While not everyone who abuses drugs will go on to develop an addiction, many will. 

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Substance Abuse vs Addiction

When Substance Abuse Becomes Addiction

Addiction is a more serious problem than substance abuse. While substance abuse can be situational, addiction is a pervasive problem affecting every aspect of a person’s life. Substance abuse is a negative behavior that a person chooses whereas addiction is a disease of the brain. Many people are able to stop abusing substances on their own, but recovering from addiction is a significantly more complex task usually requiring outside help. 

The main hallmark of addiction is physical dependency. After a person abuses drugs or alcohol for a long enough period, their brain starts to change physically, making it difficult for the person to feel normal without their substance of choice. Drug or alcohol use causes a rush of dopamine in the brain. Eventually, the brain acclimates to the euphoria and begins to demand more, building a tolerance and creating an addiction.

When an addicted person does not have drugs or alcohol in their system, the lack of dopamine beings to show ill effects. Addicted individuals will start to experience withdrawal symptoms like tremors, nausea, and hallucinations (withdrawal symptoms vary from substance to substance). Essentially the person loses their ability to function normally when not drunk or high. 

Is Addiction a Choice?

Substance abuse may be a choice, but addiction rarely is. One of the defining traits of addiction is the inability to stop using drugs or alcohol, despite the negative social or health consequences. To an addicted person, seeking out and using their substance of choice is the most important thing in life.

Addiction will cause users to lie, steal, and sneak around to use drugs or alcohol. It is not that they are inherently bad people. It is simply their illness has hijacked the decision-making parts of their brain, leading them to take actions unfathomable prior to developing an addiction. 

Addiction is widespread with more than 15 million adults in the United States addicted to alcohol, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Further, addictive behaviors cost the U.S. more than $740 billion every year in health care costs and lost productivity. The good news is addiction is treatable, although only about. Unfortunately, only about 10 percent of those addicted actually receive treatment. 

Are You Dealing With Substance Abuse or Addiction?

If you are wondering whether you or a loved has a problem with drugs or alcohol, the odds are likely that you may indeed have a problem. Whether or not the substance abuse has progressed to the level of addiction, it is important to seek help as soon as possible before the problem gets worse.

You or a loved one may be addicted to a substance if any of the following are true: 

  • You use drugs or alcohol alone.
  • You lie to friends or loved ones about your substance use.
  • You feel out of control and cannot stop drinking or using even when you want to.
  • You experience physical withdrawals when you cannot use your substance of choice.
  • Your drinking or drug use is affecting your relationships, job, or academic performance.

Seeking Help and Getting Sober

It is never too late to seek professional guidance when it comes to substance use. Substance abuse versus addiction is indeed an important question. However, most important is finding the help you or your loved needs.

If you or someone you know may be struggling with either substance abuse or addiction, let them know specially trained professionals are here to help, in addition to their friends, family, and the community they live in. Contact a professional at Desert Cove Recovery today for more information.

 

Perks of Giving up Alcohol for Good: Sobriety Perks

Perks of Giving up Alcohol for Good: Sobriety Perks

While the thought of giving up alcohol might seem overwhelming to some people, doing so can offer numerous long-term benefits. Some sobriety perks include such things as better sleep, better skin and hair, and a reduction of risk for such conditions as diabetes, cancer, liver disease and others. You may also enjoy better relationships with your friends and family. If you are thinking about giving up alcohol, it may be easier when you think about the sobriety perks that you will enjoy instead of focusing on not being able to drink.

Sleep More Without Alcohol

Drinking alcohol disrupts your sleep. In one study that was published in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, a peer-reviewed journal, the researchers found that people who drink alcohol before they go to sleep show an increase in alpha waves. Alpha waves are most common when people are awake but in a resting state. This means that your sleep is disrupted. A meta-analysis of 27 studies of alcohol’s effect on sleep found that while alcohol might help people to fall asleep faster initially, it causes them to toss and turn at night and interferes with their REM sleep. This results in fatigue, lower concentration and problems with focusing during the day. When you give up alcohol, you can look forward to better sleep, less fatigue and a better ability to concentrate during the day.

Without Alcohol Your Hair and Skin will Shine

Since alcohol is a diuretic, it can cause you to become dehydrated easily. This may also cause your skin to become less hydrated, leading to complexion problems. When you give up alcohol, you’ll notice that your skin looks fuller and less dry. Ruddiness around your nose and on your cheeks may also fade, and other skin issues may improve. your hair is also likely to improve. It may become shinier and fuller when you give up alcohol for good.

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perks of giving up alcohol

Lessen the Risk of Disease When You Give up Drinking

A huge benefit of giving up alcohol is that you can enjoy substantially lower risks of developing certain diseases. The National Cancer Institute reports that quitting drinking can reduce your risk of developing seven different types of cancer. In a study that was reported in the National Institutes of Health’s Report on Carcinogens, 19,500 cancer deaths in 2009 were alcohol-related, which accounted for 3.5 percent of the total.

In addition to reducing your risk of cancer, quitting alcohol can also help to reduce your risk of diabetes and liver disease. Your liver is responsible for processing liver. When people drink too much alcohol, the liver is unable to keep up and stores glucose as fat. If you have a fatty liver, stopping drinking may allow it to heal so that you can lower your risk of developing liver disease or cirrhosis. Moderate amounts of alcohol may cause your blood sugar to rise while excessive amounts of alcohol may cause it to fall dangerously. This may raise your risk of developing diabetes. Quitting drinking can help you to get your blood sugar under control.

Relationships Improve Without Alcohol

There is no question that alcohol can negatively impact relationships with your family and friends. When you quit drinking, you can concentrate on rebuilding these relationships. Remaining sober may help you to learn how to deal with disappointments and stress in a healthier way.

Lose Weight When You Give Up Alcohol

A great benefit of quitting drinking is that you may find that you lose excess weight almost effortlessly. There are quite a few calories in alcohol. When you stop drinking, you give up those excess calories. As long as you don’t replace the calories with desserts or snacks, you may begin to lose the excess weight that you have wanted to for a long time.

More Money When You’re Not Buying Alcohol

Drinking costs a lot of money, especially if you have been a moderate or heavy drinker or have indulged in expensive liqueurs or wines. Sitting down with a calculator and a pen and paper can be eye-opening. Tally up how much you drank each day both at home and while you were out and look at the cost. It can be very motivating for most people to remain sober when they see exactly how much their former alcohol use cost them each month. A fun thing to do is to put the money that you used to spend on alcohol in your savings and reward yourself for your sobriety with a fun trip.

Embracing sobriety for the long term may seem like a daunting idea, but you may enjoy numerous benefits when you do. Keep reminding yourself of these sobriety perks, and make certain to talk to people in your support network when you experience cravings. Soon, you will be on your way to a healthier and happier life that is alcohol-free.

Sources
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.12621/abstract

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/alcohol/alcohol-fact-sheet#q2

http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/twelfth/profiles/AlcoholicBeverageConsumption.pdf

https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/drinking-alcohol

Study: Marriage Can Help Prevent Alcohol Abuse

amjournpsychNew research appearing in the American Journal of Psychiatry has shown that first marriages to people without a history of alcohol use disorder can help prevent spouses from developing drinking problems as well.

Led by Dr. Kenneth Kendler of Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, the study examined 3 million people in Sweden, of which over 70,000 had drinking problems. Although there wasn’t a direct cause found, it was discovered that the risk of developing an alcohol use disorder among married men was 60 percent less and 71 percent less for married women compared to single people.

In a release from the American Psychiatric Association, Dr. Kendler said that the results, “strongly suggest that marriage does indeed directly and substantially reduce risk for onset of alcohol use disorder. It is also especially intriguing that this effect is largest in those at highest risk.”

Despite the many insensitive jokes of spouses being driven to drink by their marriage, this information indicates that they are actually more likely to help reinforce healthier drinking habits, including abstinence.

In the conclusion statements for the study, the authors wrote, “these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the psychological and social aspects of marriage, and in particular health-monitoring spousal interactions, strongly protect against the development of alcohol use disorder. The protective effects of marriage on risk for alcohol use disorder are increased in those at high familial risk for alcoholism.”

In a time where more research seems to look for genetic causes or brain functions relating to substance abuse, it is nice to also see studies about the social influences. All of the information combined together helps us be able to prevent alcohol and drug use disorders better as well as treat people more effectively who develop them.

If you have a loved one struggling with an alcohol problem, contact Desert Cove Recovery today to see how we can help.

Researchers Examine Alcohol Consumption and Employment

alcohol abuseHeavier drinking is more often associated with unemployment status, whether someone’s alcohol consumption caused them to lose their job, the individual is drinking more as a faulty coping mechanism as the result of losing their job or some other reason. Now there is a bit more information available regarding alcohol and employment.

Researchers at the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions showed that work stress can be directly related to increased alcohol intake. This is an important study because it sheds additional light on potential problems that adults can develop from consuming too much alcohol. When family members and friends are aware that a person may be falling into these bad habits, they have a better chance of intervening.

In addition to potential family intervention, understanding the results of this study can also be beneficial for employers. Work stressors can impact an employee’s personal life and their behavior at work as well. Trying to relieve work-related stress through drinking can become habitual, and family and work obligations and responsibilities begin to suffer. The study shows that increased alcohol consumption was not only present during normal work environments but even worse alcohol habits were reported during the economic downturn.

“Even among the employed, economic downturns can create sources of work-related and financial stress that may lead to lower levels of alcohol use during the workday, but higher levels of excessive and ill-timed alcohol use away from work,” explained Michael Frone, PhD, senior research scientist at the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions.

Certain age groups seem to be affected more than others when it comes to drinking to relieve work-related stress. The study shows that middle-aged employees are likely to drink more on the weekends, especially when the economy is not doing well, than younger employees. Researchers speculate that this is due to the increased amount of responsibility that middle-aged employees have.

While the immediate effects of stress and alcohol seem to directly impact the individuals and their health, job performance can suffer significantly as well. People who develop alcohol use disorders are more likely to have accidents or make mistakes at work, which can passes on a huge cost to employers in lost productivity alone.

New Research Targets Alcohol Cravings

euroneuropsychScientists have been hard at work researching ways to help those that suffer from addictions to alcohol. After two trials were conducted, one on humans and one on rats, there may be new hope for those that have developed alcohol dependencies.

In addition to treatment, medication that stabilizes the dopamine levels in a person’s brain seems to have a positive effect on minimizing the cravings for alcohol. Pia Steensland, the co-author of both studies, acknowledges that larger trials need to be conducted but that this is a positive step in the right direction and serves as a proof of concept. She is a neuroscientist at Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

People who struggle with alcoholism are often put on medications that cause an intense reaction when the patient consumes alcohol. These medications are given because they directly interact with the alcohol and prevent the person from feeling the effects of the substance. However, the medication is only effective if the person takes it. There are other medications used as well that have shown some results, though having more treatments available for people would be very beneficial.

This type of research is vital because every year 88,000 people die from alcohol-related causes, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In addition to those who have passed away, the U.S. currently has more than 16 million adults with some type of alcohol use disorder (AUD). The consequences of alcohol consumption spread far and wide.

This particular research targets dopamine levels in the brain. Someone under the influence of alcohol experiences increased dopamine levels, and then cravings kick in later seeking more. By targeting the dopamine directly, the results are that people will crave alcohol less, and that can be a life-saving assistant for someone in recovery. The study appeared in the journal European Neuropsychopharmacology.

Updated Survey Results Show Alcohol Use Disorders Increasing

jamanesarcOne of the largest studies commissioned regarding substance abuse-related issues has been the Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, which was updated for the third time (NESARC-III). Findings from the survey show that Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs) have increased over the past decade in the United States.

AUD is the medical diagnosis for problem drinking that causes mild to severe distress or harm. Roughly one-third of the adult population reportedly experiences and AUD at some point in their lives, but only about 20 percent seek treatment for the issue.

According to National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Director Geore Koob, Ph.D., “These findings underscore that alcohol problems are deeply entrenched and significantly under-treated in our society. The new data should provide further impetus for scientists, clinicians, and policy makers to bring AUD treatment into the mainstream of medical practice.”

The most recent NESARC update was highlighted in the journal JAMA Pschiatry. It was determined that almost 14 percent of adults met AUD criteria for the previous year, and just over 29 percent met AUD criteria at some time in their life.

To gather this information, surveyors had face-to-face conversations with 36,000 adults about their alcohol consumption. What these statistics also show is that someone doesn’t have to be classified as an alcoholic to need help.

If you know someone currently struggling with an alcohol abuse problem, contact us at Desert Cove Recovery today to find out how we can help get them back on track in life.