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pay for the opioid crisis

Who’s Going to Pay for the Opioid Crisis?

Who’s Going to Pay for the Opioid Crisis?

If you were to ask most recovering heroin addicts about their past choices, they would probably say that they would have never touched the drug if they had known the way it would affect them over the long run. When the cravings are at their worst, people will do anything they can to get their next dose, turning to crime to pay for the habit. Addicts often sell drugs to others so that they won’t run out of money, and that is why the heroin crisis is spreading across the nation like a plague.

The cost on society is much higher than most people would suspect, totaling around $193 billion. The government has to pay to investigate, prosecute and incarcerate those who commit heroin-related crimes, but the public pays for treatment and rehabilitation for those who are on public assistance. Also, many people lose their jobs because of their heroin addiction and are required to sign up for welfare programs, which further strains local, state and federal funds.

With the problem getting worse each day, many are now asking who should pay for the harm heroin has done to the nation. Getting everyone to agree won’t be an easy task, but we need to review the facts and find a solution that will repair the damage and allow us to move forward.

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Pharmaceutical Companies’ Role in the Opioid Epidemic

If you follow the trail of addiction far enough, you will find that many addicts once took prescription painkillers. People would get injured, go to the doctor and receive a prescription for opioid medications to ease the pain. After a few weeks or months, doctors wean patients off the pain medications so that they will no longer need them. By the time their doctors stop writing new prescriptions, many people have already become addicted.

Without a legitimate source of opioids, former patients often look to the streets to satisfy their cravings and stop the withdrawal symptoms. Some evidence suggests that major pharmaceutical companies knew about the danger and still opted to push their drugs to the public. Many people think that the drug manufacturers and marketers should help pay for the damage. Those who disagree with the stance say addicts only have themselves to blame.

The Government

Since the people designed the government to protect and serve the citizens, some say that it should pay for the cost of the opioid crisis. Government-funded rehabilitation centers that focus on treatment instead of punishment could have a positive impact on the nation.

Addicts would not fear prosecution and would be much more willing to seek help. Although the government would face some upfront costs, a lot of advocates believe this method is much cheaper over the long run. Critics argue that the government should not use taxpayer dollars to save people from the trap into which they have fallen.

Nonprofit Organizations

When it comes to finding a solution to the opioid epidemic that has already harmed many lives, some people say that nonprofit organizations should cover the bill. A lot of nonprofits have many connections and deep pockets that would allow them to set up treatment centers and cover the cost of overdose medications. Even though some charities offer their support, involving a few more organizations would take their results to new heights. On the other hand, some believe that nonprofit organizations should focus on assisting people who have diseases over which they have no control.

Drug Users

Since heroin addicts are responsible for the situation in which they have found themselves, they should pay for the fallout, according to some people. The argument is that heroin users had chosen to use opioids and to allow their lives to spiral out of control. The ones who don’t agree with that stance state that most heroin users have lost their jobs and homes, making them unable to pay for the damage.

Families of Drug Users

A lot of individuals feel as though a drug addict’s family should pay for the damage the drug addict has caused to society. Since they believe family members should help and support each other, they conclude that they should also pay for medical treatment, overdose medication and other expenses related to the opioid crisis.

From their perspective, family members should have spotted the warning signs and helped the addict before it was too late to find an easy answer. Others maintain that people are responsible for their own choices, so we should not hold family members accountable for an addict’s behavior.

Getting Help for Opioid Addiction

If you or someone you love is battling a heroin addiction, getting help quickly is vital, and we are here to give you a hand. We take time to get to know each client so that we can craft a treatment plan that will provide the best possible odds of success. If you have concerns, questions or are ready to start, contact us at Desert Cove Recovery today.

12 step rehab

How 12 Step Rehab Works

Will 12 Step Rehab Work for Me?

The 12 step method is considered by many addiction experts to be the best help for long-term addiction recovery. However, it is not without controversy.

Keep reading to get a better understanding of this groundbreaking approach and find out why millions of people in recovery still trust it.

How the 12 Steps Started

Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in Ohio in 1935 by Bill Wilson, a recovering alcoholic, and Dr. Robert Holbrook Smith. AA was based on this premise: When it comes to staying sober, there is strength in numbers. Alcoholics from all walks of life began meeting to share their struggles, celebrate their successes and lean on one another throughout the journey to recovery.

The 12 steps were established in 1946. Originally, the steps emphasized the importance of surrendering one’s addiction to a higher power for healing and restoration. AA also embraced the Serenity Prayer, which was penned by the American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr:

“God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.”

Throughout AA’s history, nonreligious people have objected to its heavy emphasis on spirituality. As a result, the language in many 12 step models has been amended to accommodate people from a myriad of belief systems. References to the presence of God are open to a wide variety of interpretations. Even atheists can use the basic principles for guidance.

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12 Step Sponsors

Sponsorship is also an important feature. Newcomers navigate the 12 steps alongside someone who has already worked through them and is successfully staying sober. Sponsors are typically available for questions, intervention or encouragement almost 24/7.

Another benefit is the ability to learn from others who are farther along on the journey. New members can pick up coping skills and tips for avoiding relapse from seasoned group members. There is also a compassionate atmosphere of accountability without judgment.

12 Step for Addiction Treatment

Over the years, the success of AA has spawned hundreds of other organizations for people with all kinds of addictions. Groups exist for those who struggle with drug abuse, gambling, overeating, hoarding and even addiction to using credit cards. The 12 basic steps are applicable to almost any struggle.

Nationwide, membership in groups that use the model is estimated in the millions. Many fellowships cater to specific demographic groups such as veterans, men or women only, gay people, clergy or seniors. You name it, and there’s probably a 12 step group for it somewhere.

If you talk to recovering alcoholics about the 12 step program, you may start to see a funny pattern. Many express mixed or negative feelings about going to meetings week after week or year after year. However, they grudgingly admit that attendance keeps them sober. When the choice is continued participation or relapse, many people choose to stay involved.

What Are the 12 Steps?

According to the website 12step.org, this is the most current version of the original 12 traditions:

  1. Admit powerlessness over addiction.
  2. Find hope through a higher power or higher goal.
  3. Turn the power to manage life over to the higher power.
  4. Analyze the self and behaviors objectively, described as taking a moral inventory.
  5. Share the results of the analysis with another person or the higher power.
  6. Prepare to allow the higher power to remove the negative aspects discovered in the analysis.
  7. Ask the higher power for these negative aspects to be removed.
  8. Make a list of wrongs done to others.
  9. Make amends for those wrongs as long as it is not harmful to the recipient to do so.
  10. Make self-analysis, removal of faults and amends regular practices.
  11. Meditate or pray for the continued ability to recover.
  12. Help others in need to go through the same process.

Each of the 12 steps expresses an essential value for healing. Working through them one by one empowers addicts to manage their disease and regain control of their lives.

Again, there are many alternative 12 step organizations for people who oppose the idea of God or a higher power.

12 Step Rehab

Around 75 percent of treatment programs incorporate the 12 step philosophy in some form. Most experts recommend the 12 step approach as an established, methodical process for understanding and managing addiction.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse endorses the 12 step premise that addiction cannot be cured and that preventing recurrences is a lifelong process. A study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment found that the 12 step method perfectly complements therapies geared toward changing thought patterns and behavior.

Like many other treatments, 12 step is most effective as part of a comprehensive program that incorporates other proven methods. Here are just a few treatments that can be supported by the 12 step philosophy:

  • Detox
  • Cognitive behavior therapy
  • Motivational incentives
  • Holistic methods
  • Family counseling
  • Long-term aftercare

Most people who have an addiction also have at least one other mental disorder. This is called dual diagnosis. Treating both conditions at once is far more effective than treating them separately. A study of 12 step programs published in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs found them beneficial in treating dual diagnosis.

If you need help deciding on the best treatment plan, call Desert Cove Recovery today to speak with an experienced counselor.

Adderall Abuse Among College Students

How Prevalent is Adderall Abuse Among College Students?

Adderall is the most commonly prescribed amphetamine. It is a strong central nervous system stimulant that is used primarily to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Even scientists aren’t sure how speed improves concentration or calms people who are prone to fidget.

Adderall’s effects are similar to those of cocaine, and it is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance because of its high potential for increased tolerance leading to addiction. To date, there is little research into its long-term effects.

Adderall abuse is widespread in the U.S. Young people between ages 18 and 25, particularly college students, are the worst offenders. According to the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, full-time students abuse Adderall at twice the rate of their peers who don’t attend college. On college campuses, it’s the second-most common drug of abuse. Only marijuana is more popular.

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adderall abuse among College students

Where Do Students Obtain Adderall?

Around two-thirds of young adults get their Adderall supply from friends, roommates or relatives who have prescriptions. Many buy pills from dealers. Since there is no definitive clinical test for ADHD — doctors base diagnoses largely on symptoms and the observations of parents and teachers — faking symptoms to get a prescription is common.

Students may be surprised to learn that sharing their pills, borrowing someone else’s pills, selling, buying or stealing pills, faking symptoms and taking pills at the wrong dose all constitute prescription fraud which is a felony.

Even worse, becoming addicted to Adderall poses serious health risks. Between 2006 and 2011, Adderall-related emergency room visits spiked by more than 156 percent.

What’s the Attraction of Using Adderall?

At correctly prescribed doses in patients with ADHD, Adderall improves focus, sharpens mental acuity and provides a small energy boost for more productive study. Like many drugs, Adderall also increases levels of a natural brain chemical called dopamine. Dopamine enhances feelings of well-being, confidence and reward.

College students who face a long night of cramming for finals often bump up the dose or enhance it with a high-caffeine energy drink. In theory, they can stay awake all hours, absorb everything they study, have perfect recall of the material the next day and ace the test.

In reality, things seldom work out that way. For one thing, Adderall makes no difference whatsoever if you don’t have ADHD. Indeed, that’s one of the biggest factors in diagnosis: If you take Adderall and concentration doesn’t improve, ADHD is not the problem.

For recreational use, it’s cheaper than cocaine and provides many of the same perceived benefits. Someone who is shy or suffers from low self-esteem might take Adderall to have more fun at a party. Unfortunately, like cocaine’s effects, Adderall’s are short-lived at high doses. Coming down is disappointing and unpleasant, so higher doses are required for the same sense of confidence and euphoria. The life of the party eventually becomes annoying, overly talkative, excitable, irritable or downright impossible to be around.

Other attractions for college students are increased libido and sexual stamina. Adderall may work that way for a night or two, but it has the opposite effect as tolerance increase.

Snorting Adderall is even more dangerous than taking it orally. People looking for immediate, intense effects crush pills into a powder and snort it like cocaine.

That’s a good way to destroy your nasal and sinus cavities over just a few weeks. Snorting also exacerbates the negative side effects, such as irregular heartbeat, shown below. You can overdose on Adderall by just taking too many pills, but snorting exponentially increases risk.

At the very least, taking a little extra for nonmedical reasons makes you hyperactive, overly talkative and insomniac. Here are the more serious side effects of using long term at high doses:

  • Rapid or difficult breathing
  • Increased or irregular heart rate
  • High blood pressure
  • Loss of appetite
  • Headache
  • Dry mouth
  • Hoarseness
  • Inability to sleep or sleep disturbances
  • Nausea, diarrhea or constipation
  • Shaking
  • Dizziness
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Nervousness or paranoia
  • Excitability, aggression, anxiety or hostility
  • Hallucinations
  • Depression
  • Excessive fatigue
  • Numbness in the extremities
  • Rash, hives or blistering skin
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Stroke
  • Suicidal thoughts

Abusing Adderall is so dangerous that the Food and Drug Administration mandates a black-box warning on the label.

No one intends to become addicted to a legal drug that is prescribed by competent doctors every day. It’s the same with prescription painkillers. They’re a godsend for people who require surgery, are injured in an accident or live with chronic pain long term. Painkillers are largely safe when used as directed under the supervision of a doctor, but taking just one extra pill or combining it with another drug, such as alcohol, can have catastrophic, life-changing results.

You may be in danger of becoming addicted to Adderall if you’re taking more than your doctor prescribed, taking it by a non-approved method or taking it without a prescription. Other red flags include those below:

  • Trying repeatedly to stop without success
  • Feeling tired or mentally foggy when you’re not using
  • Lying about Adderall use
  • Watching your academic performance decline
  • Stealing pills or spending a lot of money buying them
  • Losing interest in friends and social activities

Our caring staff at Desert Cove Recovery is highly experienced with Adderall abuse. Call us today for sound advice on breaking free and reclaiming your life.

holistic addiction treatment

Holistic Methods of Addiction Treatment

Holistic Methods of Addiction Treatment

Addiction affects every part of a person’s life. Relationships, career prospects, health, and spirituality can be damaged by a substance abuse problems. Drug abuse can also appear as a symptom of an issue with these or other areas of a person’s life. Without addressing these underlying problems, true healing and recovery cannot occur.

Holistic addiction treatment looks at an individual as a whole rather than focusing on a particular problem at the exclusion of other factors. By meeting the needs of the patient’s mind, body and soul at the same time, holistic addiction treatment plans are a more thorough and attentive solution.

Benefits of Holistic Addiction Treatment

The core belief behind holistic treatment is that an individual is more than the sum of his or her experiences and problems. Rather than isolating a specific issue like addiction and treating it in a vacuum, holistic treatments address concerns of the mind, body and spirit simultaneously.

This approach makes the most sense when you consider the power that addiction can have on a person’s life. Addiction can be all-consuming. It determines how a person feels, how time is spent, the quality and nature of relationships and so much more. Eliminating an addiction without addressing these other aspects of a person’s life may not be effective in the long term.

When a person is addicted, the substance at the heart of the addiction may become an all-purpose crutch to substitute for wellness and growth. Pain that is physical, spiritual or emotional in nature may be self-medicated through drugs or alcohol. When these substances are removed, the underlying issues must still be addressed.

Recognizing that sickness to the mind, body or spirit may be at the root of addiction is what separates holistic treatment from other types of drug rehab.

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holistic addiction treatment

Complementary and Integrative Therapies

Successful drug rehabilitation depends on a combination of an addiction cessation program and cognitive behavioral therapy. A program like the 12-step program provides a framework for combating and overcoming addiction within a supportive network of others in recovery. Therapy works to help a patient build better coping mechanisms and address the underlying issues that may cause addiction or exacerbate substance abuse problems.

On their own, each of these techniques is powerful. When combined, they provide a greater foundation on which a patient can build a new substance-free life. The greatest strength of the holistic treatment approach is the ability of one method’s strengths to balance out another’s weaknesses, and that is something we strive for at Desert Cove.

In addition to traditional drug rehab methods, holistic addiction treatment may also incorporate complementary and alternative or integrative medicine techniques:

  • Yoga
  • Acupuncture
  • Meditation
  • Nutritional intervention
  • Herbal medicine
  • Biofeedback
  • Reiki
  • Massage
  • Physical activities and exercise

Many holistic programs also take advantage of scenic locations. Being surrounded by nature can help to improve spiritual health and overall wellness, and the attractive atmosphere of these locations can ease the discomfort of people struggling with the decision to leave their lives for inpatient treatment at a facility.

Alternative medicine treatments are not scientifically proven to treat any specific ailment, but they have been shown to help some people with overall wellness, energy improvements, spiritual health or other benefits.

Stress relief is an important component of integrative therapy. Quitting an addictive substance is a tumultuous process that can cause significant upset and disturbance in an individual’s daily life. Providing a way to cope with that stress and manage it productively can have a tremendous benefit.

A Personalized Approach to Drug Rehab

Not all holistic drug recovery programs offer the same treatments, and not every treatment will be effective for every patient. This is why it’s important for recovery to be personalized and based on the needs of the individual. Taking the time to understand an individual’s history, background, challenges and goals helps with tailoring the treatment plan and ensuring the best possible results.

For more information about our holistic treatment options and what services we provide, contact Desert Cove Recovery today.

Perks of Giving up Alcohol for Good: Sobriety Perks

Perks of Giving up Alcohol for Good: Sobriety Perks

While the thought of giving up alcohol might seem overwhelming to some people, doing so can offer numerous long-term benefits. Some sobriety perks include such things as better sleep, better skin and hair, and a reduction of risk for such conditions as diabetes, cancer, liver disease and others. You may also enjoy better relationships with your friends and family. If you are thinking about giving up alcohol, it may be easier when you think about the sobriety perks that you will enjoy instead of focusing on not being able to drink.

Sleep More Without Alcohol

Drinking alcohol disrupts your sleep. In one study that was published in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, a peer-reviewed journal, the researchers found that people who drink alcohol before they go to sleep show an increase in alpha waves. Alpha waves are most common when people are awake but in a resting state. This means that your sleep is disrupted. A meta-analysis of 27 studies of alcohol’s effect on sleep found that while alcohol might help people to fall asleep faster initially, it causes them to toss and turn at night and interferes with their REM sleep. This results in fatigue, lower concentration and problems with focusing during the day. When you give up alcohol, you can look forward to better sleep, less fatigue and a better ability to concentrate during the day.

Without Alcohol Your Hair and Skin will Shine

Since alcohol is a diuretic, it can cause you to become dehydrated easily. This may also cause your skin to become less hydrated, leading to complexion problems. When you give up alcohol, you’ll notice that your skin looks fuller and less dry. Ruddiness around your nose and on your cheeks may also fade, and other skin issues may improve. your hair is also likely to improve. It may become shinier and fuller when you give up alcohol for good.

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perks of giving up alcohol

Lessen the Risk of Disease When You Give up Drinking

A huge benefit of giving up alcohol is that you can enjoy substantially lower risks of developing certain diseases. The National Cancer Institute reports that quitting drinking can reduce your risk of developing seven different types of cancer. In a study that was reported in the National Institutes of Health’s Report on Carcinogens, 19,500 cancer deaths in 2009 were alcohol-related, which accounted for 3.5 percent of the total.

In addition to reducing your risk of cancer, quitting alcohol can also help to reduce your risk of diabetes and liver disease. Your liver is responsible for processing liver. When people drink too much alcohol, the liver is unable to keep up and stores glucose as fat. If you have a fatty liver, stopping drinking may allow it to heal so that you can lower your risk of developing liver disease or cirrhosis. Moderate amounts of alcohol may cause your blood sugar to rise while excessive amounts of alcohol may cause it to fall dangerously. This may raise your risk of developing diabetes. Quitting drinking can help you to get your blood sugar under control.

Relationships Improve Without Alcohol

There is no question that alcohol can negatively impact relationships with your family and friends. When you quit drinking, you can concentrate on rebuilding these relationships. Remaining sober may help you to learn how to deal with disappointments and stress in a healthier way.

Lose Weight When You Give Up Alcohol

A great benefit of quitting drinking is that you may find that you lose excess weight almost effortlessly. There are quite a few calories in alcohol. When you stop drinking, you give up those excess calories. As long as you don’t replace the calories with desserts or snacks, you may begin to lose the excess weight that you have wanted to for a long time.

More Money When You’re Not Buying Alcohol

Drinking costs a lot of money, especially if you have been a moderate or heavy drinker or have indulged in expensive liqueurs or wines. Sitting down with a calculator and a pen and paper can be eye-opening. Tally up how much you drank each day both at home and while you were out and look at the cost. It can be very motivating for most people to remain sober when they see exactly how much their former alcohol use cost them each month. A fun thing to do is to put the money that you used to spend on alcohol in your savings and reward yourself for your sobriety with a fun trip.

Embracing sobriety for the long term may seem like a daunting idea, but you may enjoy numerous benefits when you do. Keep reminding yourself of these sobriety perks, and make certain to talk to people in your support network when you experience cravings. Soon, you will be on your way to a healthier and happier life that is alcohol-free.

Sources
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.12621/abstract

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/alcohol/alcohol-fact-sheet#q2

http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/twelfth/profiles/AlcoholicBeverageConsumption.pdf

https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/drinking-alcohol

routine in addiction recovery

Routine in Addiction Recovery

New Routine in Addiction Recovery

If you’re reading this, you’ve committed to staying sober. By going through drug rehab, you’ve already come a long way. Establishing a routine as quickly as possible will increase your chances of long-term success.

However, there’s a delicate balance between sticking to a schedule and obsessing over it. If you fail to plan, you open the door to relapse. If you’re rigid and inflexible, you open the door to other addictive behaviors.

Keep reading for tips on creating a routine that strikes the perfect balance.

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The Importance of Routine in Addiction Recovery

Kicking a habit once and for all is difficult if you don’t have anything to replace it with. Having idle time on your hands, time that you once filled by drinking or using drugs, can get you into trouble.

The solution is to make sure that your days and nights are reasonably full. Staying clean is easier once you get into a consistent rhythm; your brain soon kicks in to reward you for making positive changes. Even your body performs better when you set fairly consistent times for eating, sleeping and exercising. Whatever routine you design for yourself is reinforced whenever you repeat it. In time, new habits feel comfortable and familiar, and every recovering addict can use that kind of stability.

In the past, substance abuse was your default setting when you were lonely, bored, depressed or anxious. The idea is to create a new, healthier default setting in which life-enhancing habits replace self-destructive ones. If you establish a good routine, your mind, body and spirit will quickly go along with it. You’ll be in control again.

Establishing a Routine

A structured lifestyle has special benefits for recovering addicts.

Poor health and insomnia are common problems for newly sober people. Scheduling long-overdue doctor visits and dental exams will help you bounce back. Healthy meals will replace lost nutrients. Going to bed and waking at the same time each day will regulate your body clock for better sleep.

Planning a routine in addiction recovery will keep you from feeling overwhelmed. You’ll see that every aspect of life is manageable. Scheduling your time leaves little room for procrastination, loneliness and boredom, which are all triggers to relapse.

Here are some ideas for designing your routine:

  • Prioritize recovery. Quickly decide where and how often you will attend meetings or speak with your sponsor.
  • Set a regular bedtime and time to wake up. Allow time for a healthy, unrushed breakfast before work.
  • Set consistent mealtimes. Research nutrition websites for menu-planning.
  • Set realistic and consistent times for exercise. Start slowly, and gradually increase the length of your workouts as you build stamina.
  • Schedule family time or date nights with your spouse.
  • Schedule daily and weekly household tasks such as cleaning, doing laundry and paying bills.
  • Schedule time for entertainment, hobbies and socialization. You might enjoy Monday Night Football, a daily crossword, a weekly movie night or a monthly book club. Get in touch with sober friends you haven’t seen in a while. Volunteer in your community.
  • Make time for quiet, restorative activities like yoga, religious services, journaling or reading inspirational books.

Fill in all the specifics. Take a careful look at the final product, and rethink anything that could become a pitfall.

For example, your bike route shouldn’t take you past the neighborhood bar you used to frequent. You may not be ready to attend the wedding of a friend if a lot of drinking is planned. If you scheduled time for music, change up your playlist to eliminate songs that you associate with drinking or drug use. Gambling, online bidding, viewing pornography, eating junk food and even overexercising are addictive behaviors. Avoid them.

Adjusting for Balance

Try your schedule out for a few days or a couple of weeks. You may have to tweak it for balance. There shouldn’t be large gaps of free time, but you shouldn’t be working 60 hours a week or watching TV all weekend either. Scheduling diverse activities will keep you from getting bored and make you a more well-rounded person.

Remaining Flexible

Becoming fixated on a routine defeats its purpose. You fought hard to break free from addiction, so don’t become a slave to your schedule.

Don’t neglect loved ones just for the sake of ticking off items on your list. Don’t get into a predictable rut where you stagnate. Pencil in plenty of time for classes or new activities that you’ve always wanted to try.

Be flexible. As long as your choices support sobriety, you’re okay. Feel free to skip the garage cleaning on a beautiful day. Take the kids to the park instead.

At Desert Cove Recovery, we’re committed to supporting you through each stage of the journey. If you need help getting started on a routine, call us today to speak with an experienced counselor.

 

holistic addiction treatment

Benefits of Holistic Addiction Treatment

Substance abuse and addiction are serious problems that affect millions of American adults every year. It can be difficult to know the correct plan of action to take when seeking treatment. Everyone is different and handles the process of recovery in a slightly different manner, leaving some confused and overwhelmed. This following information discusses the benefits that come with holistic addiction treatment and the reasons why this manner of addiction treatment is so successful.

What Does the Term Holistic Truly Mean?

Many people do not fully understand the meaning of the word holistic. Therefore, it’s important to define the proper meaning of this type of treatment before we go any further in this discussion. Holistic refers to the concept that various systems of the body are viewed as whole entities rather than separate and unrelated body systems. In the practice of holism, all parts of the body work together as one in order to support the overall health and well-being of the individual. Therefore, when treating a serious condition such as addiction, a holistic approach involves treating all parts of the individual rather than simply addressing bothersome symptoms.

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benefits of holistic addiction treatment infographic

Six Key Benefits of Holistic Addiction Treatment

1. Treating of Mind, Body, and Spirit

A holistic approach to healing centers around the concept that the mind, body, and spirit of an individual must all be healthy in order for that person to have the most successful life that they can possibly experience. Rather than just treating the physical effects of addiction, this method combines every distinct part of an individual and ensures the health of mind, body, and spirit.

2. Effective Traditional Therapies Remain the Foundation of Care

There are many traditional methods that have been used to treat addiction for decades. These tried and true methods still form the basis of a holistic approach to substance abuse. These methods are simply expanded upon to incorporate treatment of all components of the person seeking help.

3. Caring and Compassionate Environment

Treatment professionals who believe in a holistic approach to care generally provide a safe, secure, and compassionate environment that encourages openness and healing. These individuals are trained and experienced in dealing with the difficulties brought about by addiction. They provide these therapeutic interventions in a way that conveys compassion and empathy for the struggles each individual faces.

4. High Rates of Long-Term Success

Holistic methods of treating substance abuse tend to have better long-term outcomes. A greater percentage of individuals experience a complete recovery. In addition, fewer people treated by this approach fall back into their old patterns of substance abuse and addiction.

5. Greater Selection of Diverse Treatment Options

Holistic treatment facilities utilize a wide array of treatment options. While these comforting amenities may be seen as non-essential components to some, a holistic approach recognizes the importance of treating all body systems equally. Therefore, holistic programs often provide nutritional support, massage, fitness programs, meditation, outdoor recreational programs, and so much more.

6. Quality After Care Programs and Follow Up

Holistic treatment programs also recognize that the individual’s treatment doesn’t end the second he leaves the facility. Successful rehabilitation requires a great deal of skilled follow-up and aftercare therapies. These aftercare programs act as an additional means of support to keep each individual from experiencing a devastating relapse.

Why is Holistic Addiction Treatment So Successful?

We are all complex individuals and the reasons we make specific decisions, good or bad, can be very complex as well. Holistic methods of addiction treatment are successful because they look at a person as a whole and make it a point to treat all parts of an individual successfully. Holistic approaches recognize that a person suffering from addiction is so much more than just his substance abuse problem.

The Importance of Seeking Quality Treatment Promptly

Overcoming addiction and substance abuse is a difficult process. It should come as no surprise that the majority of those experiencing these issues require additional professional support to overcome it and bring about positive change in their lives. Seeking help to overcome these problems and regain a peaceful life should be recognized as a sign of courage and strength, not one of weakness.

Desert Cove Recovery is a top quality behavioral treatment center that believes in taking a holistic approach to managing and treating serious issues such as addiction. Located in the heart of Scottsdale, Arizona, Desert Cove Recovery uses the latest in cutting-edge technologies to tailor a treatment program to fit the needs of each individual.

No matter how serious your issues may seem, you don’t have to face them alone. You can recover from your addiction and experience a peaceful life by seeking proper treatment at a quality facility. Contact Desert Cove Recovery today to find out how we can help you get started on the road to recovery.

 

never drinking again

Another Sunday of “Never Drinking Again?”

Spending Another Saturday or Sunday Hungover? Weekend Binge-Drinking Is a Serious Issue

“Ugh, I feel awful. I’m never drinking again.”

How many times have you mumbled something similar after waking up with a hangover? You have good intentions when you claim you’re never going to drink again, so you believe your declaration of sobriety. Unfortunately, you find yourself dealing with the hangover/hungover cycle again next weekend…and the weekend after that.

It doesn’t have to be like this. You can break your weekend binge-drinking habit with help from supportive, compassionate people who understand your situation.

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What is binge drinking?

Binge drinking refers to heavy drinking that quickly raises a man or woman’s blood-alcohol content (BAC) to a percentage of 0.08 grams or higher. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this usually occurs when a woman has more than 4 alcoholic beverages or a man has more than 5 alcoholic drinks in a 2-hour period.

Binge drinking is common at parties, bars, and events centered around alcohol. Some adults mindlessly consume multiple drinks as they socialize, dance, or snack on appetizers. Other folks intentionally down alcoholic beverages during drinking games, such as beer pong or Quarters.

Does binge drinking each weekend make me an alcoholic?

Not all binge drinkers are alcoholics. The CDC states that approximately 90% of heavy drinkers do not have an alcohol use disorder. (Alcoholism is an example of an alcohol use disorder.) However, that does leave approximately 10% of heavy drinkers that DO have an alcohol use disorder.

Why is binge drinking bad?

There are numerous risks associated with excessive alcohol consumption, including:

  • Vehicular crashes
  • Abnormal and/or inappropriate behavior
  • Injuries
  • Alcohol poisoning

Drinking heavily may lower your inhibitions, making you more likely to engage in activities you would normally avoid. Some potential side effects of excessive drinking, such as liver damage and memory issues, may not appear immediately.

Can a teen have a binge-drinking problem?

Binge drinking affects people of all ages, including teens and preteens. One out of every 5 drinkers are under the age of 21, and 13% of underage drinkers admit they have had recent episodes of binge drinking.

What should I do if someone I love is a weekend binge drinker?

It’s difficult to watch a loved one battle hangovers or other unwanted side effects caused by binge drinking. If you’re concerned about a loved one’s drinking, don’t lecture her or criticize her actions. Invite her to attend alcohol-free events with you, and let her know that you’re happy to lend an ear if she ever wants to talk about her drinking. Don’t press the issue; you don’t want to push your loved one away.

How do I know if I’m drinking too much?

Ask trusted friends or family members how they feel about your drinking, but keep in mind that some loved ones may sugarcoat potential issues to avoid conflict. Make a list of how your drinking affects your life. It may help to track what, how much, and when you drink on a calendar.

After tracking your alcohol consumption, do you notice a pattern of hangovers, fights with your significant other, or missed shifts at work? These are all signs that your weekend drinking habits are impacting your life in a negative way.

If I have a problem with binge drinking, does that mean I have to give up drinking forever?

This is a common concern that people who consider giving up alcohol completely. It’s difficult to imagine an alcohol-free life, especially if your social outings or business meetings frequently involve alcoholic beverages or if those around you would not be willing to cut out alcohol during gatherings.

Some binge drinkers become dependent on alcohol, so they decide it’s best to adopt a sober lifestyle. There are also people who successfully modify their drinking habits without permanently giving up alcohol. An alcohol abuse specialist can help you decide if you should limit or eliminate alcohol consumption.

You can have fun without alcohol, but adjusting to sobriety takes time. If you decide to quit drinking, make sure you surround yourself with encouraging people who support your path toward sobriety. You deserve a happy, healthy and rewarding life.

happy life not hungover

Are Elite Athletes More Susceptible to Substance Abuse?

athletes substance abuseThe results of a new study from the University of Alberta have found that there is a “strong relationship” between high-level (more intense) participation in sports and addiction. Laurie de Grace, the study’s author, found that a significant number of athletes were involved in binge drinking.

Ms. de Grace, who was pursuing a Master’s degree in the Faculty of Physical Education, originally planned to study the relationship that physical activity and participation in sports plays in developing a substance abuse issue. She had been forewarned that this may prove difficult, since physical activity seems to be linked with good mental health.

Some Sports Participation and Addiction Linked

Instead, Ms. de Grace discovered that the more risk factors that are present for a person, the more likely they are to become an addict. Participating in sports appears to have both the benefit of steering young people away from substance abuse if done as fun recreation and exercise, but it also has the potential to increase the increase the risk of addiction when taken to extreme levels with more stress and pressure.

For her research, de Grace chose to conduct interviews with people in recovery. Nearly all of them had some type of background in sport. She divided the participants into categories based on their level of participation in athletics. Specific groups in the study were recreational athletes, those who had played sports as children but who had dropped out in high school, and elite athletes.

Several sports were represented in the study, such as martial arts, rowing, gymnastics and dance. Most of the participants had competed in team sports like hockey, however.

Sports Culture May Fuel Addiction in Some Athletes

The research found that sports culture supports an attitude of machismo. The pressures on young athletes to perform is very high. Coaches may ignore drug and alcohol use, while some of them even encourage young people to adopt a lifestyle with a theme of, “Work hard, play hard.”

Some young players may start drinking to feel that they are part of the team, and model their behavior on older, more experienced players. Drinking has become intertwined with sports culture. We see winning teams filling trophies with champagne and celebrating in their locker room with alcohol after a big game.

Participating in sports is a healthy activity, and clearly not everyone who joins a sports team in their youth will become an addict. For those people who already have a number of risk factors for addiction, being in an environment where they are exposed to triggers for addiction could put them at higher risk. It would be tremendously difficult to be repeatedly exposed to that type of behavior and not take part in the drinking or drug use as well, at least to some level. We can prevent some of these problems from occurring by trying to provide better tools for young people to deal with pressure, such as mindfulness practices or various forms of non-harmful stress relief.

Continued Dangers of Combining Alcohol and Medications

medications and alcoholMany Americans know that mixing alcohol with certain medications is dangerous, but a growing number of people seem to be ignoring the warnings. In fact, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), millions of lives have been lost because they consumed alcohol while taking a medication that caused adverse reactions. In an effort to increase awareness of the dangers of mixing alcohol with certain prescription drugs, Medical Daily has put together a list of the six most deadly combinations.

  • Stimulants and alcohol. – This is a dangerous combination because the mixture of alcohol and stimulants creates an entirely new substance in the body, called cocaethylene. Cocaethylene increases the level of stress on the heart and could increase the chances of a heart attack. Long term use of alcohol and stimulants can poison the heart as well.
  • Antidepressants and alcohol. – For every drink that someone consumes while also taking antidepressants, it will feel like they have had two drinks. This is because antidepressants increase the potency of alcohol. The two chemicals also reduce a person’s ability to make good decisions and increases their risk for coma, seizures and confusion.
  • Benzodiazepines and alcohol. – This is perhaps the deadliest of all the combinations. Benzos are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States and include medications like Xanax, Valium, Ativan and Klonopin. These drugs are typically prescribed for anxiety disorders, but the combination of alcohol and benzodiazepines are so deadly that nearly 20% of all alcohol-related deaths are due to this mixture. Oftentimes people who consume alcohol with benzos end up in the hospital due to respiratory failure. Both drugs are depressants and when taken together cause the body to slow down so much so that breathing can cease.
  • Birth control and alcohol. – This is probably one of the most common combinations among female drinkers. It is dangerous because while the body is metabolizing the birth control pill, it is unable to process the alcohol regularly. This delay in processing causes many women to get drunk much quicker than they intended, paving the way for risky decision making, alcohol poisoning, and drunk driving.
  • OTC medications and alcohol. – On the back of every single over-the-counter pain medication it states not to consume alcohol while taking these medications. This is because the combination can lead to liver failure. One study reports that 38% of people who suffer from acute liver failure first consumed too much OTC pain reliever while drinking.
  • Opiates and alcohol. – This combination becomes more deadly as the amount of people who abuse heroin or prescription painkillers rises. Similar to benzodiazepines, opiates are depressants and people who take both alcohol and opiates can suffer from respiratory failure and other organ malfunctions.

Take the time to educate your friends, relatives and acquaintances about the dangers of mixing their prescriptions with alcohol, you might just help save someone’s life.